Skip Navigation LinksHome > November 2003 - Volume 17 - Issue 4 > Effects of Plyometric Training and Recovery on Vertical Jump...
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only

Effects of Plyometric Training and Recovery on Vertical Jump Performance and Anaerobic Power.

LUEBBERS, PAUL E.; POTTEIGER, JEFFREY A.; HULVER, MATHEW W.; THYFAULT, JOHN P.; CARPER, MICHAEL J.; LOCKWOOD, ROBERT H.

Collapse Box

Abstract

We examined the effects of 2 plyometric training programs, equalized for training volume, followed by a 4-week recovery period of no plyometric training on anaerobic power and vertical jump performance. Physically active, college-aged men were randomly assigned to either a 4-week (n = 19, weight = 73.4 +/- 7.5 kg) or a 7-week (n = 19, weight = 80.1 +/- 12.5 kg) program. Vertical jump height, vertical jump power, and anaerobic power via the Margaria staircase test were measured pretraining (PRE), immediately posttraining (POST), and 4 weeks posttraining (POST-4). Vertical jump height decreased in the 4-week group PRE (67.8 +/- 7.9 cm) to POST (65.4 +/- 7.8 cm). Vertical jump height increased from PRE to POST-4 in 4-week (67.8 +/- 7.9 to 69.7 +/- 7.6 cm) and 7-week (64.6 +/- 6.2 to 67.2 +/- 7.6 cm) training programs. Vertical jump power decreased in the 4-week group from PRE (8,660.0 +/- 546.5 W) to POST (8,541.6 +/- 557.4 W) with no change in the 7-week group. Vertical jump power increased PRE to POST-4 in 4-week (8,660.0 +/- 546.5 W to 8,793.6 +/- 541.4 W) and 7-week (8,702.8 +/- 527.4 W to 8,931.5 +/- 537.6 W) training programs. Anaerobic power improved in the 7-week group from PRE (1,121.9 +/- 174.7 W) to POST (1,192.2 +/- 189.1 W) but not the 4-week group. Anaerobic power significantly improved PRE to POST-4 in both groups. There were no significant differences between the 2 training groups. Four-week and 7-week plyometric programs are equally effective for improving vertical jump height, vertical jump power, and anaerobic power when followed by a 4-week recovery period. However, a 4-week program may not be as effective as a 7-week program if the recovery period is not employed.

(C) 2003 National Strength and Conditioning Association

 

Login

Article Tools

Share

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.