June 5th, 2014 - Volume 14 - Issue 11
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Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 5:43
Journal: Neurology Today June 5th, 2014, Volume 14, Issue 11;
Individuals with mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene develop brain white matter abnormalities before the onset of symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a new imaging study that was presented at the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting. In a panel discussion, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD and Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, spoke with Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center and Neuroimaging, about what these findings may signify for ALS experts and patients, and how neuroimaging could potentially improve ALS care and diagnosis in the future.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 6:27
Journal: Neurology Today June 5th, 2014, Volume 14, Issue 11;
A new study presented at the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting calls into question the use of hyperosmolar therapy for treating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In a review of outcomes from a registry of patients with ICH, investigators said those treated with hyperosmolar therapy experienced significantly worse outcomes than those who did not receive the treatment. Will these findings alter ICH care? What additional research is necessary to confirm these findings? In this video, see the answers to these and other questions in a panel discussion with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; Vladimir Hachinski, MD, professor of neurology and epidemiology at Western University in Ontario; and Jeffrey L. Saver, MD, director of stroke and vascular neurology at the University of California in Los Angeles.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:50
Journal: Neurology Today June 5th, 2014, Volume 14, Issue 11;
In a pooled analysis presented at the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting, DaTscan imaging yielded a 91-percent sensitivity rate and a 92-percent specificity rate in diagnosing parkinsonian syndrome; and a 78-percent sensitivity and 90-percent specificity for differentiating dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer's disease. In this video, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, spoke with Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center, about the potential clinical implications of these findings.