September 19, 2013 - Volume 13 - Issue 18
pp: 1-6



Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 4:16

What are the caveats of a system that applies transcranial magnetic stimulation to the brain and records high definition EEG responses? In a study reported in the Aug. 14 Science Translational Medicine, the investigators compressed the spatiotemporal pattern into a single value, ranging from 0-1, and reported, that using that formula, they were able to reliably differentiate levels of consciousness across a wide group of people — from healthy people during wakefulness, sleep, or under different sedatives; to patients in a locked-in state who can’t move on command but who understand everything; to those who have been diagnosed as minimally conscious; to others in a persistent vegetative state. In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, offer an analysis of the findings. For more discussion, read the Sept. 19 Neurology Today story, “A New Tool for Determining Levels of Consciousness.”

Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 5:22
A new study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, found an elevated risk for dementia even when blood sugar levels were far into the normal range, well below levels associated with diabetes or even prediabetes. In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, discuss the findings — and offer some caveats: among them, this was an association study and the measures compared are cognitive screening every two years and the average of all glucoses drawn over that time — many variables could be influencing these results. And there is some ambiguity — for example, it’s difficult to discriminate reliably among causes of dementia in this study. Still, the study raises many questions about how neurologists could or should be managing diabetes as a comorbidity, and whether clinicians should be thinking of the brain as another organ with the potential for end organ damage. Read the Sept. 19 Neurology Today story, “High Glucose Levels Associated with increased Risk for Dementia.”