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Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:46
Journal: Neurology Today
What’s behind the pathological process of proteins misfolding and aggregating in conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple system atrophy? The Neurology Today editors analyze insights from two new papers with David M. Holtzman, MD, FAAN, professor and chair of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:48
Journal: Neurology Today
A high-fat diet mouse model induced neuropathy similar to that observed in patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Work with the model suggests that tightly controlling blood glucose is not sufficient to prevent the development or progression of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. An emerging concept is that diabetic neuropathy is associated with metabolic syndrome, and not hyperglycemia alone. The Neurology Today editors discuss the model and how it could translate into new research targets for peripheral neuropathy with Eva Feldman, MD, PhD, FAAN, director of the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute and Program for Neurology Research and Discovery at the University of Michigan.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:25
Journal: Neurology Today

Neurology Today editors interview Kristina Simonyan, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Serena Bianchi, PhD, a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Simonyan’s laboratory, about their imaging studies showing structural differences between different phenotypes and genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia.

Read the full story on the study in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANASpasmodicDysphonia.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:17
Journal: Neurology Today
Writing in the Dec. 9, 2014 issue of Neurology, former AAN President Bruce Sigsbee, MD, and James L. Bernat, MD, FAAN, addressed three core aspects of physician burnout. Here, Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the strategies they use to address burnout among faculty at their own institutions.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 9:26
Journal: Neurology Today
The synthetic vitamin D analogue alfacalcidol significantly improved fatigue among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, researchers from Israel reported at the 2014 American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting. In this video discussion, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; and John R. Corboy, MD, professor of neurology at the University of Colorado-Denver and co-director of the Rocky Mountain Multiple Sclerosis Center at Anschutz Medical Campus, discuss the implications of these findings as well as their limitations. The full story appears in the July 3 issue of Neurology Today. Read the abstract for more information: http://bit.ly/vitDMS.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:10
Journal: Neurology Today
Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is used to measure retinal thickness, can help clinicians predict multiple sclerosis (MS) progression two to five years later, according to an international longitudinal cohort study presented at the 2016 AAN Annual Meeting and published in Lancet Neurology. Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the study with Peter Calabresi, MD, FAAN, director of the neuroimmunology division at Johns Hopkins University. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/OCT-MS.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:46
Journal: Neurology Today
In this video, our editors discuss a study that investigates the ability of clinicians to predict which patients will go on to develop mild cognitive impairment. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the findings with Alzheimer’s disease expert Dr. David Gill.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:34
Journal: Neurology Today
Two phase 2 trials of intrathecal delivery of Isis-SMNRx, an antisense molecule, showed promising results in infants and children with spinal muscular atrophy. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the findings with Kathryn J. Swoboda, MD, director of the Pediatric Motor Disorders Research Program at the University of Utah.
Creator: Nature Video
Duration: 4:26
Journal: Neurology Today
Watch here for an explanation of how scientists can control the behavior of cells simply by switching on a light. The technique, known as optogenetics, is teaching us about everything from how we wake up to how we learn. That's why Nature Methods named optogenetics as its Method of the Year 2010. Read more at nature.com/nmeth/focus/moy2010.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:40
Journal: Neurology Today
In Neurology Today’s annual “Best Advances of 2013” selection, editorial board member James L. Bernat, MD, professor of neurology and medicine at Dartmouth Medical School, chose a paper on important issues in palliative care published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Watch a video interview with Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, as they discuss the differences between palliative care and end-of-life care, primary palliative care versus specialty palliative care, and the cost-effectiveness of offering a palliative care program. See the full “Best Advances of 2013: Picks from the Neurology Today Editorial Advisory Board” article in our Dec. 19 issue: http://bit.ly/IYORLE.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 5:43
Journal: Neurology Today June 5, 2014, Volume 14, Issue 11;
Individuals with mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene develop brain white matter abnormalities before the onset of symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a new imaging study that was presented at the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting. In a panel discussion, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD and Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, spoke with Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center and Neuroimaging, about what these findings may signify for ALS experts and patients, and how neuroimaging could potentially improve ALS care and diagnosis in the future.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:05
Journal: Neurology Today
Can women with epilepsy get pregnant as easily as healthy women? Yes, according to a new study that challenges conventional wisdom that women with epilepsy have a more difficult time getting pregnant. Watch here as Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the implications of the findings with study author Page Pennell, MD, director of research in the epilepsy division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/NT-fertility.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 5:53
Journal: Neurology Today
At the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting, investigators reported the results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, international multi-center study of selisistat in individuals with Huntington’s disease (HD). They found that, apart from increases in liver function tests in a subset of patients, selisistat was safe and well tolerated. In this video, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, discuss the meaning of these results with David Holtzman, MD, professor and chair of neurology at Washington University in St. Louis. See the full meeting abstract here: http://bit.ly/HD-neuro.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 9:00
Journal: Neurology Today
A new study by a team of researchers at the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center suggests that diabetes is not associated with the hallmark pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Rather, the data show that cerebrovascular disease — brain infarcts — associated with diabetes can lead to dementia, and that larger infarcts, rather than very small ones, seem to play a role. The Neurology Today editors discuss the findings with Alzheimer's disease expert Steven T. DeKosky, MD, FAAN, deputy director of the McKnight Brain Institute and professor of neurology at the University of Florida.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 4:02
Journal: Neurology Today
Patients with atrial fibrillation who underwent left atrial appendage closure fared better over several years than patients who took warfarin, according to a head-to-head comparison of the two stroke prevention therapies. Here, Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, review the data and their potential impact on standards of care.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 6:28
Journal: Neurology Today
The editors of Neurology Today discuss a new study from this year’s AAN Annual Meeting, which looked at how accurate brain biopsies are for diagnosing CNS vasculitis. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the utility of brain biopsies for CNS vasculitis with Yale University neurocritical care expert Dr. Kevin Sheth.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:50
Journal: Neurology Today June 5, 2014, Volume 14, Issue 11;
In a pooled analysis presented at the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting, DaTscan imaging yielded a 91-percent sensitivity rate and a 92-percent specificity rate in diagnosing parkinsonian syndrome; and a 78-percent sensitivity and 90-percent specificity for differentiating dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer's disease. In this video, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, spoke with Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center, about the potential clinical implications of these findings.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:22
Journal: Neurology Today
The American Academy of Neurology recently released a position paper on opioid use for chronic noncancer pain, finding that “there is no substantial evidence of pain relief or improved function over long periods of time without incurring serious risk of overdose, dependence, or addiction.” Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the paper.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 2:43
Journal: Neurology Today
An antisense oligonucleotide tailored to target part of the messenger RNA of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) was found safe in a small trial involving 21 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but the investigators contend they need to do more long-term experiments in animal models of ALS before moving forward. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD discuss the promise and challenges ahead for antisense oligonucleotide therapy for ALS.
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