Most Popular Videos

Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:02
Journal: Neurology Today
Results from exome-sequencing suggest lysosomal storage gene variants may predispose some people to PD, according to a new study presented at the AAN Annual Meeting. Brent Fogel, MD, PhD, FAAN, associate professor of neurology and human genetics at University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the possible clinical ramifications — the potential to target lysosomal pathways — with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, MD, FAAN, of the University of Rochester. Read more about the study: http://bit.ly/NT-PDLysosomal.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:46
Journal: Neurology Today
What’s behind the pathological process of proteins misfolding and aggregating in conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple system atrophy? The Neurology Today editors analyze insights from two new papers with David M. Holtzman, MD, FAAN, professor and chair of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:17
Journal: Neurology Today
Writing in the Dec. 9, 2014 issue of Neurology, former AAN President Bruce Sigsbee, MD, and James L. Bernat, MD, FAAN, addressed three core aspects of physician burnout. Here, Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the strategies they use to address burnout among faculty at their own institutions.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 4:55
Journal: Neurology Today
Sepsis may contribute to the risk of long-term seizures, according to a study presented at this year’s AAN Annual Meeting. Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN, chair and professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, AZ, discusses the clinical implications of the study in a discussion with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, of the University of Rochester. Read more about the sepsis and seizures association: http://bit.ly/NT-SepsisSeizures.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:48
Journal: Neurology Today
A high-fat diet mouse model induced neuropathy similar to that observed in patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Work with the model suggests that tightly controlling blood glucose is not sufficient to prevent the development or progression of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. An emerging concept is that diabetic neuropathy is associated with metabolic syndrome, and not hyperglycemia alone. The Neurology Today editors discuss the model and how it could translate into new research targets for peripheral neuropathy with Eva Feldman, MD, PhD, FAAN, director of the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute and Program for Neurology Research and Discovery at the University of Michigan.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:06
Journal: Neurology Today
Results from a meta-analysis presented at the AAN Annual Meeting suggest resuming oral anticoagulation after an ICH decreases mortality risk and results in better outcomes. In a discussion with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, MD, FAAN, of the University of Rochester, Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, chair and professor of neurology at the University of Kentucky, said residual confounding factors among other limitations with this type of analysis must be considered when weighing these findings. Read more about the study: http://bit.ly/NT-AnticoagulationICH.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 10:54
Journal: Neurology Today
The FDA-approved drug, nusinersen, and gene therapy agent, AVXS-101 were both found effective for SMA in studies presented at the AAN Annual Meeting. Brent Fogel, MD, PhD, FAAN, associate professor of neurology and human genetics at University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the underlying pathogenesis of SMA and the difficult clinical decisions that each presents with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, of the University of Rochester. Read more about nusinersen results and the AVXS-101 study: http://bit.ly/NT-NusinersenGeneTherapy.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:05
Journal: Neurology Today
Can women with epilepsy get pregnant as easily as healthy women? Yes, according to a new study that challenges conventional wisdom that women with epilepsy have a more difficult time getting pregnant. Watch here as Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the implications of the findings with study author Page Pennell, MD, director of research in the epilepsy division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/NT-fertility.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:25
Journal: Neurology Today

Neurology Today editors interview Kristina Simonyan, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Serena Bianchi, PhD, a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Simonyan’s laboratory, about their imaging studies showing structural differences between different phenotypes and genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia.

Read the full story on the study in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANASpasmodicDysphonia.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 12:43
Journal: Neurology Today

A 5-year follow-up study found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus improved motor function for people with early-stage Parkinson’s disease compared to medical treatment alone. The study’s principal investigator David Charles, MD, FAAN, professor and vice chairman of neurology at Vanderbilt Neuroscience Institute, discusses the advantages and complications of treating patients in early stages of the disease with the Neurology Today editors.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-DBSEarlyParkinsons.

Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 4:58
Journal: Neurology Today May 16, 2013, Volume 13, Issue 10;
In a study presented at the AAN annual meeting last March, researchers reported that three preoperative tests combined with clinical judgment are helpful in predicting diaphragm excitability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. In a video interview, Neurology Today’s Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, discuss the implications of these findings for ALS experts and patients.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 5:05
Journal: Neurology Today
For Neurology Today’s “Best Advances of 2013,” David Gill, MD, an editorial advisory board member, selected a Neurology study that looked at autopsies of subjects with and without symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) who had varying degrees of AD neuropathologic changes. Among the findings, expression of AD symptoms was affected more by neurofibrillary tangle scores than neuritic plaque burden, and symptomatic patients tended to be older, have a history of recent depression, and have higher Hachinski Ischemic Scores, suggestive of vascular dementia (although cerebrovascular pathology was not associated with symptoms). Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Dr. Gill discuss the unanswered questions raised by these findings, including: Is amyloid imaging a good idea for patients at this point? If amyloid is found in the brain, does that mean the patient will develop Alzheimer’s disease? Are PET scans and spinal taps more or less accurate than clinical acumen? See the full “Best Advances of 2013: Picks from the Neurology Today Editorial Advisory Board” article in our Dec. 19 issue: http://bit.ly/IYORLE.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:10
Journal: Neurology Today
Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is used to measure retinal thickness, can help clinicians predict multiple sclerosis (MS) progression two to five years later, according to an international longitudinal cohort study presented at the 2016 AAN Annual Meeting and published in Lancet Neurology. Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the study with Peter Calabresi, MD, FAAN, director of the neuroimmunology division at Johns Hopkins University. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/OCT-MS.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 6:28
Journal: Neurology Today
The editors of Neurology Today discuss a new study from this year’s AAN Annual Meeting, which looked at how accurate brain biopsies are for diagnosing CNS vasculitis. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the utility of brain biopsies for CNS vasculitis with Yale University neurocritical care expert Dr. Kevin Sheth.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration:
Journal: Neurology Today
Stenting rates for carotid-artery stenosis have not declined, despite evidence suggesting endarterectomy may be more effective, according to a study reported at the AAN Annual Meeting. In a discussion with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, of the University of Rochester, Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, chair and professor of neurology at the University of Kentucky suggests that each therapy should be compared with medical therapy, and that findings from CREST-2 should provide more information for clinical decision-making. Read more about the study: http://bit.ly/NT-StentingStenosis.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:27
Journal: Neurology Today
Patients who are treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), or alteplase, treatment for ischemic stroke may not need a routine computed tomography (CT) scan, according to a study by researchers at University of North Carolina. Commenting on the study, Vladimir Hachinski, MD, FAAN, professor of neurology University of Western Ontario, emphasized that doctors should evaluate the need for a CT scan for each patient individually depending on the type of stroke they had. Watch as Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven P. Ringel, FAAN,and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., FAAN, discuss the study with Dr. Hachinski.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:51
Medical marijuana appears to help alleviate spasticity and central or spasm-related pain and some other multiple sclerosis symptoms, but there is little evidence of efficacy in treating epilepsy or movement disorders, according to two systematic reviews published by the AAN earlier this year. In this video, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; and Neurology Editor-in-Chief Robert A. Gross, MD, PhD, discuss the available evidence for medical marijuana use in neurological disorders, as well as the lingering gaps in knowledge.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:46
Journal: Neurology Today
In this video, our editors discuss a study that investigates the ability of clinicians to predict which patients will go on to develop mild cognitive impairment. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the findings with Alzheimer’s disease expert Dr. David Gill.