Most Popular Videos

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Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:02
Journal: Neurology Today
Results from exome-sequencing suggest lysosomal storage gene variants may predispose some people to PD, according to a new study presented at the AAN Annual Meeting. Brent Fogel, MD, PhD, FAAN, associate professor of neurology and human genetics at University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the possible clinical ramifications — the potential to target lysosomal pathways — with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, MD, FAAN, of the University of Rochester. Read more about the study: http://bit.ly/NT-PDLysosomal.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:25
Journal: Neurology Today

Neurology Today editors interview Kristina Simonyan, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Serena Bianchi, PhD, a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Simonyan’s laboratory, about their imaging studies showing structural differences between different phenotypes and genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia.

Read the full story on the study in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANASpasmodicDysphonia.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:27
Journal: Neurology Today
Patients who are treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), or alteplase, treatment for ischemic stroke may not need a routine computed tomography (CT) scan, according to a study by researchers at University of North Carolina. Commenting on the study, Vladimir Hachinski, MD, FAAN, professor of neurology University of Western Ontario, emphasized that doctors should evaluate the need for a CT scan for each patient individually depending on the type of stroke they had. Watch as Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven P. Ringel, FAAN,and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., FAAN, discuss the study with Dr. Hachinski.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 10:54
Journal: Neurology Today
The FDA-approved drug, nusinersen, and gene therapy agent, AVXS-101 were both found effective for SMA in studies presented at the AAN Annual Meeting. Brent Fogel, MD, PhD, FAAN, associate professor of neurology and human genetics at University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the underlying pathogenesis of SMA and the difficult clinical decisions that each presents with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, of the University of Rochester. Read more about nusinersen results and the AVXS-101 study: http://bit.ly/NT-NusinersenGeneTherapy.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:07
Journal: Neurology Today

A meta-analysis of 5 trials found that the procedure was more effective for stroke, the sooner it was performed, but remained effective up to 7.3 hours after symptom onset – significantly longer than the current guideline window of 6 hours. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, MPH, FAAN, discuss what the findings mean for stroke treatment and minimizing time to reperfusion.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANAEndovascular.

Creator: Editor
Duration: 9:00
Journal: Neurology Today
A new study by a team of researchers at the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center suggests that diabetes is not associated with the hallmark pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Rather, the data show that cerebrovascular disease — brain infarcts — associated with diabetes can lead to dementia, and that larger infarcts, rather than very small ones, seem to play a role. The Neurology Today editors discuss the findings with Alzheimer's disease expert Steven T. DeKosky, MD, FAAN, deputy director of the McKnight Brain Institute and professor of neurology at the University of Florida.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:46
Journal: Neurology Today
What’s behind the pathological process of proteins misfolding and aggregating in conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple system atrophy? The Neurology Today editors analyze insights from two new papers with David M. Holtzman, MD, FAAN, professor and chair of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 12:43
Journal: Neurology Today

A 5-year follow-up study found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus improved motor function for people with early-stage Parkinson’s disease compared to medical treatment alone. The study’s principal investigator David Charles, MD, FAAN, professor and vice chairman of neurology at Vanderbilt Neuroscience Institute, discusses the advantages and complications of treating patients in early stages of the disease with the Neurology Today editors.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-DBSEarlyParkinsons.

Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:10
Journal: Neurology Today
Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is used to measure retinal thickness, can help clinicians predict multiple sclerosis (MS) progression two to five years later, according to an international longitudinal cohort study presented at the 2016 AAN Annual Meeting and published in Lancet Neurology. Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the study with Peter Calabresi, MD, FAAN, director of the neuroimmunology division at Johns Hopkins University. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/OCT-MS.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:06
Journal: Neurology Today
Results from a meta-analysis presented at the AAN Annual Meeting suggest resuming oral anticoagulation after an ICH decreases mortality risk and results in better outcomes. In a discussion with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, MD, FAAN, of the University of Rochester, Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, chair and professor of neurology at the University of Kentucky, said residual confounding factors among other limitations with this type of analysis must be considered when weighing these findings. Read more about the study: http://bit.ly/NT-AnticoagulationICH.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:51
Medical marijuana appears to help alleviate spasticity and central or spasm-related pain and some other multiple sclerosis symptoms, but there is little evidence of efficacy in treating epilepsy or movement disorders, according to two systematic reviews published by the AAN earlier this year. In this video, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; and Neurology Editor-in-Chief Robert A. Gross, MD, PhD, discuss the available evidence for medical marijuana use in neurological disorders, as well as the lingering gaps in knowledge.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 9:40
Journal: Neurology Today
Neurology Editor-in-chief Robert A. Gross, MD, PhD, FAAN, an epilepsy expert, discusses that question — and the limitations of the animal model and experiment — in a video dialogue with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN. Read the original abstract from the meeting here: http://bit.ly/AAN-SE.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:17
Journal: Neurology Today
Writing in the Dec. 9, 2014 issue of Neurology, former AAN President Bruce Sigsbee, MD, and James L. Bernat, MD, FAAN, addressed three core aspects of physician burnout. Here, Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the strategies they use to address burnout among faculty at their own institutions.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:05
Journal: Neurology Today
Can women with epilepsy get pregnant as easily as healthy women? Yes, according to a new study that challenges conventional wisdom that women with epilepsy have a more difficult time getting pregnant. Watch here as Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the implications of the findings with study author Page Pennell, MD, director of research in the epilepsy division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/NT-fertility.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 6:33
Journal: Neurology Today
Over time, medical therapy for unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) led to fewer strokes and deaths than surgical intervention, according to a five-year analysis of data from the randomized ARUBA trial. Vladimir Hachinski, MD, FAAN, professor of neurology at the University of Western Ontario, discusses the clinical ramifications of the new data in this interview with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/ARUBA-NT.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 4:30
Journal: Neurology Today
In the intensive care unit, neurologists need different types of skill sets, says Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel. On one hand, they are tasked with saving the life of a critically ill person; when that is not possible, they also need to know how to communicate that to their patient and/or their loved ones. In a video interview, Dr. Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the unique challenges of tending to neurologic patients in the ICU.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 9:25
Journal: Neurology Today
In a video interview with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Orly Avitzur, MD, Dr. Pedley outlines his top four agenda items. Watch here as he discusses: the AAN focus on advocacy in Washington, DC Academy strategies for tailoring its services and programs to individual members’ interests; how to increase the AAN profile and outreach to an international audience of neurologists; and why he favors supporting more diversity in AAN leadership positions.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 5:43
Journal: Neurology Today June 5th, 2014, Volume 14, Issue 11;
Individuals with mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene develop brain white matter abnormalities before the onset of symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a new imaging study that was presented at the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting. In a panel discussion, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD and Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, spoke with Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center and Neuroimaging, about what these findings may signify for ALS experts and patients, and how neuroimaging could potentially improve ALS care and diagnosis in the future.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 6:27
Journal: Neurology Today June 5th, 2014, Volume 14, Issue 11;
A new study presented at the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting calls into question the use of hyperosmolar therapy for treating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In a review of outcomes from a registry of patients with ICH, investigators said those treated with hyperosmolar therapy experienced significantly worse outcomes than those who did not receive the treatment. Will these findings alter ICH care? What additional research is necessary to confirm these findings? In this video, see the answers to these and other questions in a panel discussion with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; Vladimir Hachinski, MD, professor of neurology and epidemiology at Western University in Ontario; and Jeffrey L. Saver, MD, director of stroke and vascular neurology at the University of California in Los Angeles.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:50
Journal: Neurology Today June 5th, 2014, Volume 14, Issue 11;
In a pooled analysis presented at the 2014 AAN Annual Meeting, DaTscan imaging yielded a 91-percent sensitivity rate and a 92-percent specificity rate in diagnosing parkinsonian syndrome; and a 78-percent sensitivity and 90-percent specificity for differentiating dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer's disease. In this video, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, spoke with Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center, about the potential clinical implications of these findings.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 9:26
Journal: Neurology Today
The synthetic vitamin D analogue alfacalcidol significantly improved fatigue among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, researchers from Israel reported at the 2014 American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting. In this video discussion, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; and John R. Corboy, MD, professor of neurology at the University of Colorado-Denver and co-director of the Rocky Mountain Multiple Sclerosis Center at Anschutz Medical Campus, discuss the implications of these findings as well as their limitations. The full story appears in the July 3 issue of Neurology Today. Read the abstract for more information: http://bit.ly/vitDMS.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:11
Journal: Neurology Today
In a panel discussion, David S. Knopman, MD, FAAN, a professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN; Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN; and Associate Editor Robert Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, offer an analysis of why a blood test for Alzheimer's disease is needed and the challenges that remain ahead for ensuring that it is accurate. Read the Annual Meeting abstract which inspired the discussion: http://bit.ly/1kqYYIG.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 4:16

What are the caveats of a system that applies transcranial magnetic stimulation to the brain and records high definition EEG responses? In a study reported in the Aug. 14 Science Translational Medicine, the investigators compressed the spatiotemporal pattern into a single value, ranging from 0-1, and reported, that using that formula, they were able to reliably differentiate levels of consciousness across a wide group of people — from healthy people during wakefulness, sleep, or under different sedatives; to patients in a locked-in state who can’t move on command but who understand everything; to those who have been diagnosed as minimally conscious; to others in a persistent vegetative state. In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, offer an analysis of the findings. For more discussion, read the Sept. 19 Neurology Today story, “A New Tool for Determining Levels of Consciousness.”

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