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Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:46
Journal: Neurology Today
What’s behind the pathological process of proteins misfolding and aggregating in conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple system atrophy? The Neurology Today editors analyze insights from two new papers with David M. Holtzman, MD, FAAN, professor and chair of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:48
Journal: Neurology Today
A high-fat diet mouse model induced neuropathy similar to that observed in patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Work with the model suggests that tightly controlling blood glucose is not sufficient to prevent the development or progression of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. An emerging concept is that diabetic neuropathy is associated with metabolic syndrome, and not hyperglycemia alone. The Neurology Today editors discuss the model and how it could translate into new research targets for peripheral neuropathy with Eva Feldman, MD, PhD, FAAN, director of the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute and Program for Neurology Research and Discovery at the University of Michigan.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 5:40
Journal: Neurology Today
Vladimir Hachinski, MD, a member of Neurology Today’s editorial advisory board, selected a paper in this year’s Brain that examined the vascular components of dementia in autopsy cases for Neurology Today’s “Best Advances of 2013.” All types of dementias were found to have a vascular component, according to the study. In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and David Gill, MD, an editorial advisory board member, talk about how these data may affect management of Alzheimer’s patients — or at least the discussion they should elicit in the clinical care setting. See the full “Best Advances of 2013: Picks from the Neurology Today Editorial Advisory Board” article in our Dec. 19 issue: http://bit.ly/IYORLE.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:02
Journal: Neurology Today
Results from exome-sequencing suggest lysosomal storage gene variants may predispose some people to PD, according to a new study presented at the AAN Annual Meeting. Brent Fogel, MD, PhD, FAAN, associate professor of neurology and human genetics at University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the possible clinical ramifications — the potential to target lysosomal pathways — with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, MD, FAAN, of the University of Rochester. Read more about the study: http://bit.ly/NT-PDLysosomal.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:17
Journal: Neurology Today
Writing in the Dec. 9, 2014 issue of Neurology, former AAN President Bruce Sigsbee, MD, and James L. Bernat, MD, FAAN, addressed three core aspects of physician burnout. Here, Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the strategies they use to address burnout among faculty at their own institutions.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:06
Journal: Neurology Today
Results from a meta-analysis presented at the AAN Annual Meeting suggest resuming oral anticoagulation after an ICH decreases mortality risk and results in better outcomes. In a discussion with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, MD, FAAN, of the University of Rochester, Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, chair and professor of neurology at the University of Kentucky, said residual confounding factors among other limitations with this type of analysis must be considered when weighing these findings. Read more about the study: http://bit.ly/NT-AnticoagulationICH.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 4:14
Journal: Neurology Today
Does a change in ACHR-antibody level predict clinical change? In a new paper from the AAN annual meeting, researchers found that antibody testing was not strongly predictive of clinical outcomes for myasthenia gravis, and that clinical exams and observations are better indicators for clinical status. In a video interview, Neurology Today’s Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, discuss the implications of these findings and why they reinforce the need for clinicians to “choose wisely” the tests they use to diagnose and provide prognosis on neurological conditions.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:46
Journal: Neurology Today
In this video, our editors discuss a study that investigates the ability of clinicians to predict which patients will go on to develop mild cognitive impairment. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the findings with Alzheimer’s disease expert Dr. David Gill.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:11
Journal: Neurology Today
In a panel discussion, David S. Knopman, MD, FAAN, a professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN; Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN; and Associate Editor Robert Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, offer an analysis of why a blood test for Alzheimer's disease is needed and the challenges that remain ahead for ensuring that it is accurate. Read the Annual Meeting abstract which inspired the discussion: http://bit.ly/1kqYYIG.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:10
Journal: Neurology Today
Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is used to measure retinal thickness, can help clinicians predict multiple sclerosis (MS) progression two to five years later, according to an international longitudinal cohort study presented at the 2016 AAN Annual Meeting and published in Lancet Neurology. Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the study with Peter Calabresi, MD, FAAN, director of the neuroimmunology division at Johns Hopkins University. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/OCT-MS.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:05
Journal: Neurology Today
Can women with epilepsy get pregnant as easily as healthy women? Yes, according to a new study that challenges conventional wisdom that women with epilepsy have a more difficult time getting pregnant. Watch here as Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the implications of the findings with study author Page Pennell, MD, director of research in the epilepsy division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/NT-fertility.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 10:54
Journal: Neurology Today
The FDA-approved drug, nusinersen, and gene therapy agent, AVXS-101 were both found effective for SMA in studies presented at the AAN Annual Meeting. Brent Fogel, MD, PhD, FAAN, associate professor of neurology and human genetics at University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the underlying pathogenesis of SMA and the difficult clinical decisions that each presents with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, of the University of Colorado, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway, of the University of Rochester. Read more about nusinersen results and the AVXS-101 study: http://bit.ly/NT-NusinersenGeneTherapy.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 1:43
Journal: Neurology Today
From the AAN annual meeting: What is the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and risk for dementia? David Gill, MD, a cognitive behavioral neurologist at Unit Rehabilitation & Neurology in Rochester, NY, who chose this paper as “noteworthy” from the dementia papers at the AAN annual meeting, offers an analysis of the new data here and what it means for clinicians.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 9:26
Journal: Neurology Today
The synthetic vitamin D analogue alfacalcidol significantly improved fatigue among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, researchers from Israel reported at the 2014 American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting. In this video discussion, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; and John R. Corboy, MD, professor of neurology at the University of Colorado-Denver and co-director of the Rocky Mountain Multiple Sclerosis Center at Anschutz Medical Campus, discuss the implications of these findings as well as their limitations. The full story appears in the July 3 issue of Neurology Today. Read the abstract for more information: http://bit.ly/vitDMS.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 12:43
Journal: Neurology Today

A 5-year follow-up study found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus improved motor function for people with early-stage Parkinson’s disease compared to medical treatment alone. The study’s principal investigator David Charles, MD, FAAN, professor and vice chairman of neurology at Vanderbilt Neuroscience Institute, discusses the advantages and complications of treating patients in early stages of the disease with the Neurology Today editors.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-DBSEarlyParkinsons.

Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 7:40
Journal: Neurology Today
In Neurology Today’s annual “Best Advances of 2013” selection, editorial board member James L. Bernat, MD, professor of neurology and medicine at Dartmouth Medical School, chose a paper on important issues in palliative care published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Watch a video interview with Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, as they discuss the differences between palliative care and end-of-life care, primary palliative care versus specialty palliative care, and the cost-effectiveness of offering a palliative care program. See the full “Best Advances of 2013: Picks from the Neurology Today Editorial Advisory Board” article in our Dec. 19 issue: http://bit.ly/IYORLE.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 6:15
Journal: Neurology Today

Two new developments reported at the 2013 American Neurological Association annual meeting have neuromuscular specialists excited for the first time in a while about potential “breakthroughs” for a disorder that has been difficult to diagnose and treat. In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, discuss what’s known about the clinical phenotype of sporadic inclusion body myositis and how it’s currently diagnosed, as well as the two different “camps” in thinking about its underlying mechanism — whether there is an inflammatory or degenerative process. Hear more about the current standards for treatment and their shortcomings, as well as why the findings from the new report — the increase in thigh muscle volume and the suggestion of additional improvements in function — are potential breakthroughs.

For more discussion, read the Nov. 21 Neurology Today reports from the ANA meeting.

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