Sorting Working Memory Test, from the NIH Toolbox

Video Author: NIH
Created on: 10.29.2012

A video demonstration of the Sorting Working Memory Test from the NIH Toolbox. NIH Toolbox is a multidimensional set of brief measures assessing cognitive, emotional, motor, and sensory function from ages 3-85, meeting the need for a standard set of measures that can be used as a “common currency” across diverse study designs and settings. Visit www.nihtoolbox.org for more information.

All Videos
Most Viewed
Most Emailed



Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:25

Neurology Today editors interview Kristina Simonyan, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Serena Bianchi, PhD, a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Simonyan’s laboratory, about their imaging studies showing structural differences between different phenotypes and genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia.

Read the full story on the study in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANASpasmodicDysphonia.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:12

Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, MPH, FAAN, discuss the challenges of measuring the value of neurodiagnostic tests, with a dearth of available data on efficacy.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANADiagnosticTests.

Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:07

A meta-analysis of 5 trials found that the procedure was more effective for stroke, the sooner it was performed, but remained effective up to 7.3 hours after symptom onset – significantly longer than the current guideline window of 6 hours. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, MPH, FAAN, discuss what the findings mean for stroke treatment and minimizing time to reperfusion.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANAEndovascular.

Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 12:43

A 5-year follow-up study found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus improved motor function for people with early-stage Parkinson’s disease compared to medical treatment alone. The study’s principal investigator David Charles, MD, FAAN, professor and vice chairman of neurology at Vanderbilt Neuroscience Institute, discusses the advantages and complications of treating patients in early stages of the disease with the Neurology Today editors.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-DBSEarlyParkinsons.

Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 6:33
Over time, medical therapy for unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) led to fewer strokes and deaths than surgical intervention, according to a five-year analysis of data from the randomized ARUBA trial. Vladimir Hachinski, MD, FAAN, professor of neurology at the University of Western Ontario, discusses the clinical ramifications of the new data in this interview with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/ARUBA-NT.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:10
Elevated levels of sulfonylurea receptor-1 (SUR1), in cerebrospinal fluid may be a potential biomarker of edema after traumatic brain injury, and slower declines in Sur1 levels is associated with worse clinical status, according to a study by investigators at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Watch as Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven P. Ringel, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., FAAN, discuss the study with Kevin N. Sheth, MD, FAAN, chief, of the division of neurocritical care & emergency neurology at Yale New Haven Hospital. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/SUR1-NT
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:10
Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is used to measure retinal thickness, can help clinicians predict multiple sclerosis (MS) progression two to five years later, according to an international longitudinal cohort study presented at the 2016 AAN Annual Meeting and published in Lancet Neurology. Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the study with Peter Calabresi, MD, FAAN, director of the neuroimmunology division at Johns Hopkins University. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/OCT-MS.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:27
Patients who are treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), or alteplase, treatment for ischemic stroke may not need a routine computed tomography (CT) scan, according to a study by researchers at University of North Carolina. Commenting on the study, Vladimir Hachinski, MD, FAAN, professor of neurology University of Western Ontario, emphasized that doctors should evaluate the need for a CT scan for each patient individually depending on the type of stroke they had. Watch as Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven P. Ringel, FAAN,and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., FAAN, discuss the study with Dr. Hachinski.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:05
Can women with epilepsy get pregnant as easily as healthy women? Yes, according to a new study that challenges conventional wisdom that women with epilepsy have a more difficult time getting pregnant. Watch here as Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the implications of the findings with study author Page Pennell, MD, director of research in the epilepsy division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/NT-fertility.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 9:00
A new study by a team of researchers at the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center suggests that diabetes is not associated with the hallmark pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Rather, the data show that cerebrovascular disease — brain infarcts — associated with diabetes can lead to dementia, and that larger infarcts, rather than very small ones, seem to play a role. The Neurology Today editors discuss the findings with Alzheimer's disease expert Steven T. DeKosky, MD, FAAN, deputy director of the McKnight Brain Institute and professor of neurology at the University of Florida.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:48
A high-fat diet mouse model induced neuropathy similar to that observed in patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Work with the model suggests that tightly controlling blood glucose is not sufficient to prevent the development or progression of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. An emerging concept is that diabetic neuropathy is associated with metabolic syndrome, and not hyperglycemia alone. The Neurology Today editors discuss the model and how it could translate into new research targets for peripheral neuropathy with Eva Feldman, MD, PhD, FAAN, director of the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute and Program for Neurology Research and Discovery at the University of Michigan.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:22
The Neurology Today editors analyze two new studies that track readmission rates among neurology patients in hospitals throughout the US with S. Andrew Josephson, MD, a professor and senior executive vice chair of the University of California, San Francisco.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:46
What’s behind the pathological process of proteins misfolding and aggregating in conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple system atrophy? The Neurology Today editors analyze insights from two new papers with David M. Holtzman, MD, FAAN, professor and chair of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 6:02
In this video, our editors discuss a new study that suggests that transthyretin could serve as the first gene-specific biomarker for ALS and frontotemporal dementia. Dr. Brent Fogel discusses the findings with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:46
In this video, our editors discuss a study that investigates the ability of clinicians to predict which patients will go on to develop mild cognitive impairment. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the findings with Alzheimer’s disease expert Dr. David Gill.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 9:10
In this video, our editors discuss a new evidence-based guideline from the AAN and the American Epilepsy Society that looks at factors that contribute to decisions about whether to treat an unprovoked first seizure in adults with an antiepileptic drug. Study author Dr. Jacqueline French discusses the findings of the review and its implications with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 6:57
A new proof-of-principle study used inexpensive tablets and video conferencing software to screen stroke patients en route to the hospital. Dr. James Grotta discusses the most promising advances in assessing stroke in the ambulance with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:12
In this video, Dr. John Corboy discusses a new study, which looked at the potential for a PET tracer to predict clinical outcomes and potential remyelination in MS. Dr. Corboy discusses the opportunities and caveats of the findings with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 6:28
The editors of Neurology Today discuss a new study from this year’s AAN Annual Meeting, which looked at how accurate brain biopsies are for diagnosing CNS vasculitis. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the utility of brain biopsies for CNS vasculitis with Yale University neurocritical care expert Dr. Kevin Sheth.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:50
In this video, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editors Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. and Dr. Orly Avitzur discuss strategies neurologists can develop to educate patients and get them involved in their own care. Read the paper by Dr. Ringel, “The practice of neurology: Looking ahead by looking back,” in the May 19 issue of Neurology.



Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:25

Neurology Today editors interview Kristina Simonyan, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Serena Bianchi, PhD, a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Simonyan’s laboratory, about their imaging studies showing structural differences between different phenotypes and genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia.

Read the full story on the study in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANASpasmodicDysphonia.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 12:43

A 5-year follow-up study found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus improved motor function for people with early-stage Parkinson’s disease compared to medical treatment alone. The study’s principal investigator David Charles, MD, FAAN, professor and vice chairman of neurology at Vanderbilt Neuroscience Institute, discusses the advantages and complications of treating patients in early stages of the disease with the Neurology Today editors.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-DBSEarlyParkinsons.

Creator: TED
Duration: 18:48
Oliver Sacks, MD, neurologist and author of Hallucinations, presenting a special TED lecture in 2009 on the underlying neurological substrates of Charles Bonnet syndrome, in which visually impaired people experience lucid hallucinations.
See the Dec. 20 issue of Neurology Today for a review of Hallucinations.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 7:07

A meta-analysis of 5 trials found that the procedure was more effective for stroke, the sooner it was performed, but remained effective up to 7.3 hours after symptom onset – significantly longer than the current guideline window of 6 hours. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, MPH, FAAN, discuss what the findings mean for stroke treatment and minimizing time to reperfusion.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANAEndovascular.

Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 6:33
Over time, medical therapy for unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) led to fewer strokes and deaths than surgical intervention, according to a five-year analysis of data from the randomized ARUBA trial. Vladimir Hachinski, MD, FAAN, professor of neurology at the University of Western Ontario, discusses the clinical ramifications of the new data in this interview with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/ARUBA-NT.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:48
A high-fat diet mouse model induced neuropathy similar to that observed in patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Work with the model suggests that tightly controlling blood glucose is not sufficient to prevent the development or progression of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. An emerging concept is that diabetic neuropathy is associated with metabolic syndrome, and not hyperglycemia alone. The Neurology Today editors discuss the model and how it could translate into new research targets for peripheral neuropathy with Eva Feldman, MD, PhD, FAAN, director of the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute and Program for Neurology Research and Discovery at the University of Michigan.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 9:10
In this video, our editors discuss a new evidence-based guideline from the AAN and the American Epilepsy Society that looks at factors that contribute to decisions about whether to treat an unprovoked first seizure in adults with an antiepileptic drug. Study author Dr. Jacqueline French discusses the findings of the review and its implications with Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:10
Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is used to measure retinal thickness, can help clinicians predict multiple sclerosis (MS) progression two to five years later, according to an international longitudinal cohort study presented at the 2016 AAN Annual Meeting and published in Lancet Neurology. Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the study with Peter Calabresi, MD, FAAN, director of the neuroimmunology division at Johns Hopkins University. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/OCT-MS.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:12

Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, MPH, FAAN, discuss the challenges of measuring the value of neurodiagnostic tests, with a dearth of available data on efficacy.

Read the full story in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/NT-ANADiagnosticTests.

Creator: Editor
Duration: 8:46
What’s behind the pathological process of proteins misfolding and aggregating in conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple system atrophy? The Neurology Today editors analyze insights from two new papers with David M. Holtzman, MD, FAAN, professor and chair of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 5:40
Vladimir Hachinski, MD, a member of Neurology Today’s editorial advisory board, selected a paper in this year’s Brain that examined the vascular components of dementia in autopsy cases for Neurology Today’s “Best Advances of 2013.” All types of dementias were found to have a vascular component, according to the study. In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and David Gill, MD, an editorial advisory board member, talk about how these data may affect management of Alzheimer’s patients — or at least the discussion they should elicit in the clinical care setting. See the full “Best Advances of 2013: Picks from the Neurology Today Editorial Advisory Board” article in our Dec. 19 issue: http://bit.ly/IYORLE.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:17
Writing in the Dec. 9, 2014 issue of Neurology, former AAN President Bruce Sigsbee, MD, and James L. Bernat, MD, FAAN, addressed three core aspects of physician burnout. Here, Neurology Today Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the strategies they use to address burnout among faculty at their own institutions.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:10
Elevated levels of sulfonylurea receptor-1 (SUR1), in cerebrospinal fluid may be a potential biomarker of edema after traumatic brain injury, and slower declines in Sur1 levels is associated with worse clinical status, according to a study by investigators at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Watch as Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven P. Ringel, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., FAAN, discuss the study with Kevin N. Sheth, MD, FAAN, chief, of the division of neurocritical care & emergency neurology at Yale New Haven Hospital. Read the Neurology Today article about the study here: http://bit.ly/SUR1-NT
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 9:26
The synthetic vitamin D analogue alfacalcidol significantly improved fatigue among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, researchers from Israel reported at the 2014 American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting. In this video discussion, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; and John R. Corboy, MD, professor of neurology at the University of Colorado-Denver and co-director of the Rocky Mountain Multiple Sclerosis Center at Anschutz Medical Campus, discuss the implications of these findings as well as their limitations. The full story appears in the July 3 issue of Neurology Today. Read the abstract for more information: http://bit.ly/vitDMS.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 2:09
Are neurologists discussing folic acid supplementation and contraception with women of childbearing age? A new AAN annual meeting report found that in nearly half of cases, there was no documented discussion in electronic medical records showing that women had been counseled about the risks of taking valproic acid; nor was there was there mention of the importance of taking folic acid. In a video interview, Jacqueline A. French, MD, professor of neurology at New York University Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and president of the American Epilepsy Society, discusses what this can mean for clinicians seeing women with epilepsy of childbearing age.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 4:30
In the intensive care unit, neurologists need different types of skill sets, says Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel. On one hand, they are tasked with saving the life of a critically ill person; when that is not possible, they also need to know how to communicate that to their patient and/or their loved ones. In a video interview, Dr. Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the unique challenges of tending to neurologic patients in the ICU.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 3:22
From the AAN annual meeting: What is the clinical importance of new research on the cost-effectiveness of decompressive hemicraniectomy for malignant stroke? In a video interview, Kevin N. Sheth, MD, chief of the Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology and director of the Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit at Yale New Haven Hospital, discusses implications and next steps.
Creator: TED MED
Duration: 10:05
Find out how one MacArthur Fellow is making inroads in helping blind people see. Sheila Nirenberg, PhD, a professor of physiology and biophysics at Weill Cornell Medical College, was one of 24 people named in September as a 2013 MacArthur Fellow for her work in developing a prosthetic device to restore sight. Here in this TED video, she describes how the technique she developed to use neural codes to bypass damaged retinal networks in blind mice could be applied to develop new prosthetic hearing devices and even a prosthetic that could help a stroke patient regain lost speech. See the full story in the Nov. 7 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 9:00
A new study by a team of researchers at the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center suggests that diabetes is not associated with the hallmark pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Rather, the data show that cerebrovascular disease — brain infarcts — associated with diabetes can lead to dementia, and that larger infarcts, rather than very small ones, seem to play a role. The Neurology Today editors discuss the findings with Alzheimer's disease expert Steven T. DeKosky, MD, FAAN, deputy director of the McKnight Brain Institute and professor of neurology at the University of Florida.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 6:44
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine reported compelling evidence that human narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease that results when people with certain gene variants are exposed to a virus or a vaccine that induces the body to launch an attack on hypocretin-producing cells. The paper, authored by Emmanuel Mignot, MD, PhD, director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, and colleagues, was published in the Dec. 18 issue of Science Translational Medicine. In this video, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD; Neurology Today Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH; and Michael E. Yurcheshen, MD, associate professor of neurology and medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center, discuss how these findings may affect future treatment of narcolepsy. Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/MxwIGk.
Creator: Neurology Today
Duration: 4:14
Does a change in ACHR-antibody level predict clinical change? In a new paper from the AAN annual meeting, researchers found that antibody testing was not strongly predictive of clinical outcomes for myasthenia gravis, and that clinical exams and observations are better indicators for clinical status. In a video interview, Neurology Today’s Editor-in-Chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, discuss the implications of these findings and why they reinforce the need for clinicians to “choose wisely” the tests they use to diagnose and provide prognosis on neurological conditions.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 8:27
Patients who are treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), or alteplase, treatment for ischemic stroke may not need a routine computed tomography (CT) scan, according to a study by researchers at University of North Carolina. Commenting on the study, Vladimir Hachinski, MD, FAAN, professor of neurology University of Western Ontario, emphasized that doctors should evaluate the need for a CT scan for each patient individually depending on the type of stroke they had. Watch as Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven P. Ringel, FAAN,and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., FAAN, discuss the study with Dr. Hachinski.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:22
The American Academy of Neurology recently released a position paper on opioid use for chronic noncancer pain, finding that “there is no substantial evidence of pain relief or improved function over long periods of time without incurring serious risk of overdose, dependence, or addiction.” Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the paper.
Creator: Editor
Duration: 5:46
In this video, our editors discuss a study that investigates the ability of clinicians to predict which patients will go on to develop mild cognitive impairment. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Dr. Steven Ringel and Associate Editor Dr. Robert Holloway Jr. discuss the findings with Alzheimer’s disease expert Dr. David Gill.