Neurology Today Podcast

Listen to neurologists speak about new studies, technologies, medicines, and other emerging topics in the field of neurology.
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Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 13:45
The first randomized, placebo-controlled trial to examine that question suggests that it is. Neurology Today speaks with the study principals — Gil I. Wolfe, MD, FAAN, the Irvin and Rosemary Smith professor and chair in the department of neurology at the University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences of SUNY, and Gary Cutter, PhD, professor of biostatistics at University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, about the long road to providing class 1 evidence for the therapy. Read the Neurology Today article: http://bit.ly/NT-thymectomy.
Creator: Sarah Owens
Duration: 11:48
Neurology Today 
The Food and Drug Administration is considering a new drug application for deflazacort based on data from a 1995 study released in Neurology. Here, the senior study author Robert C. Griggs, MD, FAAN, professor of neurology, medicine, pediatrics, pathology & laboratory medicine in the Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, discusses what the findings could mean for DMD therapy. For more about the study, read the Oct. 6 issue of Neurology Today: neurotodayonline.com.
Creator: Fay Ellis
Duration: 10:35
Neurology Today 
Two new studies presented at the Alzheimer’s Association meeting in Copenhagen found that people in the early stages of Alzheimer’s have subtle deficits in odor identification, a finding that could help diagnose the disease very early on. In this podcast, Neurology Today speaks with Mark Albers, MD, PhD, assistant professor of neurology at Harvard University and a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Davangere Devanand, MD, professor of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center, about their research. For more information, see the associated article in the September 4 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Fay Ellis
Duration: 12:34
Neurology Today 
Story Landis, PhD, director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for more than a decade, has announced that she will retire this fall. In this podcast, Dr. Landis speaks with Neurology Today about her groundbreaking work with the NINDS, her decision to retire, and where she believes research in neurology is heading next. For more information, see the associated article in the September 4 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 6:19
Neurology Today 
Sean J. Pittock, MD, an associate professor of neurology and co-director of the Neuroimmunology Laboratory at Mayo Clinic, and colleagues published an April 4 Neurology study on autoimmune epilepsy. The Mayo researchers found encouraging, but preliminary results for the use of immunotherapy in medically intractable patients with suspected autoimmune epilepsy. In this interview, Dr. Pittock discusses the findings, and what future studies are necessary. See the associated article in the May 1 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 11:20
Neurology Today 
What could the findings from the Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s Disease trial (A4) — a new secondary prevention trial in older people with amyloid accumulation at high risk for Alzheimer’s disease dementia — mean for Alzheimer’s disease? Earlier detection and possibly earlier intervention, according to the lead author of the A4 trial. In this podcast interview, Reisa A. Sperling, MD, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, discusses the challenges the investigators foresee and the possible benefits. See the associated article in the April 17 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 5:55
Neurology Today 

Despite the growing number of disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS), a major gap remains when it comes to treatments that are both safe and effective in the long term. So it is no surprise that many MS patients turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to try to reduce the disease burden. These treatments, however, are not without their own unique risks — especially since CAM is largely unregulated and inadequately studied.

In order to provide guidance to neurologists and their patients, the AAN Guideline Development Subcommittee conducted a comprehensive review of the available literature (from 1970 to 2013) on CAM therapies for MS. The review appeared in the March 25 issue of Neurology.

“The AAN recognized that people with MS tend to use CAM therapy quite frequently, but that there was a lack of scientifically validated information or educational materials for providers to educate themselves or their patients in a systematic way,” said study author Vijayshree Yadav, MD, an assistant professor of neurology at Oregon Health and Sciences University Multiple Sclerosis Center. In an interview with Neurology Today, she discussed the new recommendations — their practical applications, unexpected findings, and remaining research needs.

Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 6:09
Neurology Today 
The concept of death by neurologic criteria — the irreversible loss of the clinical function of the whole brain, commonly known as brain death — was at the center of a very public ethical debate after two tragic stories-turned-legal-battles took the media by storm in January. In this podcast interview, James L. Bernat, MD, professor of neurology and medicine, and Louis and Ruth Frank professor of neuroscience at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, talks to Neurology Today about what these two cases may mean for public understanding of death by neurologic criteria, and how to talk to families and the public in such difficult situations.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 6:57
Neurology Today 
Kevin Kerber, MD, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Michigan Health System, was honored with the prestigious Derek Denny-Brown Neurological Scholar Award at the American Neurological Association meeting last October. Here, he discusses his efforts to combine neuro-otology and health services research to produce meaningful outcomes on a larger scale. For the full-text story, see the Jan. 16 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 11:25
Neurology Today 
In a new study published in the Sept. 25 online issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, Jeffrey J. Perry, MD, from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and colleagues found six high-risk clinical factors which resulted in a 100-percent sensitivity rate for ruling out subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients who presented with acute headache in the emergency department. In this podcast, Dileep Yavagal, MD, associate professor in the department of neurology & neurosurgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, spoke about the significance of these findings and their potential clinical implications. For the full text version of this article, see the Nov. 7 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 7:40
Neurology Today 
According to a new study published in the Oct. 2013 edition of Epilepsy & Behavior, 20 percent of U.S. neurologists surveyed by e-mail said they were unaware of updated drug safety risks and recommendations for antiepileptic drugs. David G. Vossler, MD, clinical associate professor of neurology and medical director of the University of Washington Medicine Valley Medical Center Neuroscience Institute in Renton, WA, spoke with Neurology Today of some of the current challenges to communication, as well as potential strategies to improve the transmission of the FDA’s safety warnings to neurologists. For the full story, see the Oct. 17 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 19:53
Neurology Today 
In September, Richard H. Scheller, PhD, and Thomas C. Südhof, MD, were awarded with the 2013 Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research for their independent efforts to unravel the molecular events that underlie the regulation of the release of neurotransmitters at the synapse. In a podcast interview with Neurology Today, they describe their research and what their basic findings could mean for neurological diseases and disorders. See the full story in the Oct. 17 issue of Neurology Today
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 8:07
Neurology Today 
Medication alone does not control symptoms for nearly half of all patients with essential tremor, the most common movement disorder. But, according to a pilot study in the Aug.15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), MRI-guided focused ultrasound thalamotomy may be a promising, noninvasive treatment option for these individuals.
The NEJM investigators reported a significant improvement in all 15 of the patients treated in this pilot study. Study author Binit B. Shah, MD, assistant professor of neurology at the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Division at the University of Virginia, spoke with Neurology Today about the implications of this study for neurologists and essential tremor patients. For the full story, see the Oct. 3 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 12:03
Neurology Today 
Experts on dystonia teamed up to bring an old definition and a classification system up to date. Anthony E. Lang, MD, a movement disorders specialist at the University of Toronto, talks to Neurology Today about the new consensus report — what they changed, what they kept in, and why — to make the diagnosis of dystonia more accurate. For the full story, see the September 5 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Lola Butcher
Duration: 6:04
Anup Patel, MD, director of the complex epilepsy clinic at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, OH, and his colleagues are working to reduce hospital use by their patients with epilepsy. In this podcast, he describes how he applies the “Plan, Do, Study, Act” technique suggested by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement to assess how a small change in process can ensure a larger improvement in quality of care. For the full-text article, see the July 4 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 9:26
How physicians frame questions and communicate with surrogate decision-makers in the emergency department can have a significant effect on the chosen course of treatment, according to a new study in the May 8 online edition of Critical Care Medicine. In response, Maisha T. Robinson, MD, who completed fellowship training in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and a Neurohospitalist fellowship at Mayo Clinic, spoke with Neurology Today about neurocritical care and the importance of clear end-of-life communication in the ICU. For the full text version of this article see the July 4 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 7:34
Neurology Today 
In a poster presented at the AAN annual meeting last March, researchers reported that three preoperative tests combined with clinical judgment are helpful in predicting diaphragm excitability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Here, author Robert Baloh, MD, director of neuromuscular medicine in the department of neurology at Cedars-Sinai, talks about the currently available data on the Diaphragm Pacing System in ALS patients and what research still needs to be done.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 7:36
Neurology Today 
Is performing decompressive hemicraniectomy in patients with malignant stroke cost-effective? Here, Tenbit Emiru, MD, PhD, a fellow in the neurology department at the University of Minnesota, describes new data on the relative cost of this procedure in highly morbid patients.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 10:51
Neurology Today 

Joseph P. Broderick, MD, of the University of Cincinnati, led IMS III, an international study of 656 patients (at 58 centers) comparing tPA versus endovascular therapy following tPA. Listen as Dr. Broderick highlights the findings from this and other trials on endovascular therapy for stroke — and what they mean for clinicians. For the full-text version of this article, see the March 21 issue of Neurology Today.

Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 6:54
Neurology Today 
Christopher M. DeGiorgio, MD, professor of neurology at the University of California-Los Angeles, and vice president of NeuroSigma, discusses the benefits of external trigeminal nerve stimulation, and how it could affect epilepsy treatment for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. For the full article, see the Feb. 21 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 13:05
Neurology Today 
Michael K. O’Banion, MD, PhD, a professor in the department of neurobiology and anatomy at the University of Rochester Medical Center, discusses the methodology and findings of a study in which investigators exposed transgenic Alzheimer’s disease mice to levels of radiation similar to that experienced by astronauts in space; they reported an increase in amyloid-beta plaques and cognitive impairment. What are the implications for human space travel? For the full article, see the Feb. 21 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 8:10
Neurology Today 
Craig Fowler, vice president of training and recruiting at Pinnacle Health Group, offers neurologists advice on how to work successfully with a recruiter — what to ask, what information to provide, and how to maintain a mutually beneficial relationship. For the full-text version, see the Feb. 7 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 19:13
Dean Falk, PhD, senior scholar at the School for Advanced Research in New Mexico and the Hale G. Smith professor of anthropology at Florida State University, gained access in 2010 to previously undiscovered photos that had been taken postmortem of the brain of physicist Albert Einstein. Here, in edited remarks, Dr. Falk discusses the new photos and what they suggest about the neurological underpinnings of Einstein's unique cognitive abilities.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 4:33
A recent paper in the Journal of Neurosurgery offers a retrospective analysis of the density of neurosurgeons/neurologists per population as compared with the number of deaths from stroke over a three-year period. The research team found a significant reduction in mortality associated with an increase in density of neurology providers. Atman Desai, MD, chief neurosurgery resident at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, NH, discusses the association of neurology providers and reduced stroke mortality.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 10:50
Orrin Devinsky, MD, professor of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry, and director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York University Langone Medical Center, and his colleagues surveyed neurologists in the United States and Canada about their perspectives on discussing sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP) with their patients or their families. They also surveyed patients and 574 caregivers, virtually all of whom said that they wanted to know about SUDEP. Here, he discusses the results of the surveys presented at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society in December and what neurologists can do to frame the discussion about SUDEP in a more positive way. See the Jan. 3 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 4:57
Neurology Today 
John Hardy, PhD, chair of the department of molecular neuroscience at University College London’s Institute of Neurology, who led one of two international genome-wide association studies implicating TREM2 in Alzheimer’s disease, discusses the variant’s role in microglial responses and inflammatory cascades, which can lead to an overblown inflammatory response and neuronal death. See the Dec. 20 issue of Neurology Today for the full article.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 7:05
Neurology Today 
Davangere Devanand, MD, professor of clinical psychiatry and neurology at Columbia, discusses his Oct. 18 paper in the New England Journal of Medicine, which found that Alzheimer’s disease patients who were showing vexing social behaviors were two to three times likely to relapse after being taken off of risperidone, and what the findings mean for neurologists. For the full-text article, see the Dec. 6 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 9:26
Neurology Today 
Dr. Brian W. Hainline, chief of the Division of Neurology and Integrative Pain Medicine at ProHEALTH Care Associates and clinical associate professor of neurology at NYU School of Medicine, has been named the first chief medical officer of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Listen as he talks to Neurology Today about his goals for the new position and how his experience as a physician and athlete has prepared him for the task.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 6:57
Neurology Today 
Henry J. Kaminski, MD, chair of the department of neurology at the George Washington University, talks to Neurology Today about burnout among neurology chairs and senior faculty, and the faculty development sessions held at the 2012 American Neurological Association Annual Meeting in Boston. For the full-text version, see the Nov. 16 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 11:32
Neurology Today 
Chet C. Sherwood, PhD, associate professor of anthropology in the Laboratory for Evolutionary Neuroanatomy at George Washington University, describes new experiments comparing myelination in chimpanzees and humans and what the findings suggest for understanding disease and human development.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 9:15
Philip L. De Jager, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology at Harvard University, describes the investigation that unraveled two distinct RNA profiles for MS patients, reflecting different levels of disease activity.
Creator: Lola Butcher
Duration: 4:36
Neurology Today 
How will the ACO movement affect your practice? Here, Bruce H. Cohen, MD, professor of pediatrics and director of neurology in the NeuroDevelopmental Science Center at Akron Children’s Hospital in Ohio, discusses the implications for independent practice and academic practice.
Creator: Lola Butcher
Duration: 2:10
Neurology Today 
What will independent practice entail in the future? Constantine Moschonas, MD, director of Four Peaks Neurology in Scottsdale, AZ, shares his vision for the future of patient-centered medical care.
Creator: Lola Butcher
Duration: 4:42
Neurology Today 
How and why should neurologists stay tuned to online patient communities? Daniel Hoch, MD, PhD, a Harvard University professor, epilepsy specialist, and director of Digital Initiatives for the Benson Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, discussed why listening to what patients have to say could promote research advances and improved care.
Creator: Lola Butcher
Duration: 2:49
Neurology Today 
How does neurology compare with other specialties in quality measurement? Richard M. Dubinsky, MD, MPH, program director for the neurology residency program at University of Kansas Medical Center, offers his assessment here of neurology’s challenges — and its leadership.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 6:24
Neurology Today 
Can data from clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs in adults be extrapolated to predict treatment response for children? Raj D. Sheth, MD, chief of neurology at Nemours and professor of neurology at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Jacksonville, FL, discusses the strengths and limitations of a new review published in the Sept. 5 online edition of Neurology. For the full-text article, see the Oct. 18 issue.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 5:54
Neurology Today 
Dr. Avindra Nath, chief of the Section of Infections of the Nervous System and clinical director of National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), discusses West Nile virus in humans, as well as research and treatments currently in the pipeline. For the full-text version of this article, see the Oct. 4 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 10:49
Neurology Today 
Barth Green, MD, co-founder of the Miami Project and chairman of neurosurgery at the University of Miami, talks with Neurology Today about the opportunities for neural stem cell transplantation to cure paralysis — what investigators have learned to date and what lies ahead. For the full-text version of this article, see the Oct. 4 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 7:43
Neurology Today 

Listen here as Lois Margaret Nora, MD, JD, MBA, recently appointed president and chief executive officer of the American Board of Medical Specialties, talks to Neurology Today about the trajectory of her career — and leadership— and offers advice for budding neurologists. For the full-text version of this article, see the Sept. 20 issue.

Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 5:34
Neurology Today 

Dr. Timothy Hain, professor of neurology; otolaryngology; and physical therapy/human movement science at Northwestern University Medical School, talks to Neurology Today about the potential risks and benefits associated with internet and YouTube usage for the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). For the full-text version of this article, see the Sept. issue of Neurology Today.

Duration: 4:45
Neurology Today 
Cathy Sila, MD, professor of neurology and director of the stroke center at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center, discusses delirium and long-term cognitive decline in cardiac surgery patients, as well as strategies for improving screening and care for this population. For the full text version of this article, see the august 16 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 7:04
Neurology Today 
How did investigators come to discover that oligodendroglia play a role in neurodegeneration? Listen here as Jeffrey D. Rothstein, MD, PhD, lead investigator of the July 12 online paper in Nature, describes the backstory of how researchers made the surprise discovery — and where they’re going next with it.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 14:18
Neurology Today 
Lead DIAN investigator John C. Morris, MD, the Harvey A. and Dorismae Hacker Friedman distinguished professor of neurology at Washington University in St. Louis, and director of the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, discusses in more detail the biomarker changes that occurred 20-25 years prior to the onset of cognitive decline in people who had a 50 percent chance of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 4:58
Neurology Today 
Dr. Shyam Prabhakaran, associate professor of neurology at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago, talks to Neurology Today about the cost-effectiveness of implementing tPA in hospitals, as well as other strategies for improving stroke care in the US.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 6:08
Neurology Today 
Victoria S. Pelak, MD, associate professor and director of the residency program in the neurology department at the University of Colorado-Denver School of Medicine, talks to Neurology Today about the important strides being made in simulation-based education, and why there is no time like the present to start using these methods.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 5:08
Neurology Today 
Jennifer L. Hopp, MD, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, speaks about why the data from the North American AED Pregnancy Registry are so important for neurologists, and how she counsels her female patients with epilepsy before and during pregnancy. For the full commentary, see the June 7 issue.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 5:16
Neurology Today 
Lead author Sonia Hernández-Díaz, MD, DrPH, associate professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, talks to Neurology Today about how neurologists can use the findings from the North American AED Pregnancy Registry in practice, as well as the future research goals of the registry. For the full commentary, see the June 7 issue.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 5:31
Neurology Today 
Lead author of the AAN’s updated guidelines for migraine treatment, Stephen D. Silberstein, MD, professor of neurology and director of the Jefferson Headache Center at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, spoke with Neurology Today about what has changed in migraine care over the last decade, how he determines which therapies to use for individual patients, and where there is more need for research.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 12:58
Neurology Today 
Anthony J. Furlan, MD, the Gilbert Humphrey Professor of Neurology, chairman of the department of neurology and co-director of the Neurological Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, and Marc Fisher, MD, professor of neurology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and editor of Stroke, talk to Neurology Today about recent data which say treating PFOs may not reduce recurrent stroke.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 10:24
Neurology Today 
Dr. Eva Feldman, Russell N. DeJong Professor of Neurology and director of the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute at the University of Michigan Health System, and president of the ANA, spoke with Neurology Today about the decision to expand ANA membership and how she hopes it will rejuvenate the historical, academic organization.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 11:23
Neurology Today 
Dr. Daniel H. Lowenstein, professor and vice chairman in the department of neurology at UCSF, and Dr. Robert Silbergleit, emergency physician at the University of Michigan Health System, spoke with Neurology Today about a recent study comparing an emergency anti-seizure medication administered by a syringe with the intravenous form typically used by paramedics. Listen as they discuss the findings and potential implications of this research. For the full-text article, see the March 15 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 8:21
Neurology Today 
Dr. Bradley Hyman, director of the Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and John B. Penney Jr. Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, and Dr. Karen Duff, professor of pathology at Columbia University's Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, spoke to Neurology Today about two recent studies that provide compelling evidence for the spread of Alzheimer disease between neurons in the brain. For the full-text article, see the March 15 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 8:37
Neurology Today 
Neurology Today spoke with Dr. Thomas W. Frazier of the Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital Center for Autism and Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health about the implications of the proposed definition change for autism criteria in the DSM-5. He discussed why he thinks the change is justified and how to make the criteria more inclusive for all individuals with autism spectrum disorders. For the full-text article, see the March 1 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 9:57
Neurology Today 
Scientists have turned to a yeast model to screen for genetic modifiers of amyloid beta toxicity and have identified several genes known to be associated with Alzheimer disease and a few surprises that could help explain how the toxic protein exerts its toxicity in the brain. One of the study authors, Rudolph Tanzi, PhD, director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at the Massachusetts General Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease & Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, talked to Neurology Today about the findings, published in the Dec. 2 Science.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 12:02
Neurology Today 
Dr. Michael A. Williams, neurologist and medical director of the Sandra and Malcolm Berman Brain & Spine Institute at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, talked to Neurology Today about the American College of Physicians’ 6th Edition Ethics Manual. Listen as he talks about why it’s important for physicians to consider health care costs and suggests strategies for putting cost-effective care into policy and practice. For the full-text article, see the Feb. 16 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 11:14
Neurology Today 
Elliott Schulman, MD, has been very vocal in advocating for abused patients with neurological issues, and educating other neurologists on the subject of abuse. Listen as Dr. Schulman, an adjunct clinical professor of neurology at Jefferson School of Medicine and professor at Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, talks to Neurology Today about the first-ever AAN position statement on abuse and violence. For the full text article, see the Feb. 2 issue.
Creator: Olga Rukovets
Duration: 10:48
Neurology Today 
The chair of the AAN Ethics Section, Farrah J. Mateen, MD, of the department of neurology at Johns Hopkins University, talked to Neurology Today about the American College of Physicians Sixth Edition Ethics Manual. She discusses cost-effectiveness, professional responsibility to the poor and uninsured, and the physician’s role as teacher. For the full-text article, see the Feb. 16 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jaime Talan
Duration: 7:39
Neurology Today 
Elizabeth C. Finger, MD, an assistant professor in the department of clinical neurological sciences, spoke with Neurology Today about her recent study, published in 2011 in Brain, where she and her colleagues found that a single dose of oxytocin tested in a double-blind crossover trial in patients with FTD altered performance on a number of neuropsychological tests as well as caregiver rating scales. See the full-text version of this interview in the Jan. 19 issue of Neurology Today.
Creator: Jaime Talan
Duration: 10:43
Neurology Today 
Louis J. Ptáček, MD, and colleagues identified a gene involved in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with infantile convulsions (PKD/IC) that will hopefully lead to a better understanding of the condition. Dr. Ptáček, professor of neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, talks to Neurology Today about their study findings and implications.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 19:23
Neurology Today 
Steven P. Ringel, MD, Neurology Today’s editor-in-chief, and Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, MPH, an associate editor, talk about the most “game-changing” neurology studies from the past year. See the Jan. 5 issue of Neurology Today for the full-text article and all of the selections from the editorial advisory board.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 8:01
Neurology Today 
Merit Cudkowicz, MD, of Harvard Medical School, discusses the results of a phase 2 study—a reduction in functional decline and a significant drop in the death rate in those on the highest dose of the drug, dexpramipexole.
Creator: Jamie Talan
Duration: 8:01
In the Nov. 10 online edition of The Lancet, researchers reported on a study finding that one in five patients in a vegetative state showed evidence on an EEG recording that they understood commands — squeezing their hand and wiggling toes — repeatedly during a 20-minute testing period. Listen here as study co-author Damian Cruse, PhD, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Western Ontario, describes the potential for using EEG to assess patients in a vegetative state.