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Tuesday, December 17, 2013
NIH Announces New Concussion Research To Be Funded by the NFL

Yesterday, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced eight new research projects focused on traumatic brain injury, including understanding long-term effects of repeated head injuries and improving diagnosis of concussions.

 

       These projects will be funded by the Sports and Health Research Program, a partnership among the NIH, the National Football League, and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH). The NFL donated $30 million in 2012 to FNIH for research studies on injuries affecting athletes, with brain trauma being the primary area of focus.

 

      “We need to be able to predict which patterns of injury are rapidly reversible and which are not. This program will help researchers get closer to answering some of the important questions about concussion for our youth who play sports and their parents,” said Story Landis, Ph.D., director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), in a press release.

 

      Two of the projects are large $6 million cooperative agreements between NINDS, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and multiple academic medical centers to define the scope of long-term brain changes after a head injury or multiple concussions.

 

     The remaining six are pilot studies, receiving just over $2 million in funding for up to two years, that will support the initial stages of sports-related concussion projects. These initiatives will be managed by the NINDS, NICHD, and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD).

 

     See our previous coverage of concussion research in Neurology Today: http://bit.ly/1c9oa3b.

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