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Neurology Today:
doi: 10.1097/01.NT.0000440979.71509.cb
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TUNE IN, JOIN IN THE DIALOGUE: Are a new diagnostic blood assay and a novel treatment for inclusion body myositis ready for prime time?

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TUNE IN, JOIN IN THE DIALOGUE: Are a new diagnostic blood assay and a novel treatment for inclusion body myositis ready for prime time? Two new developments reported at the 2013 American Neurological Association annual meeting have neuromuscular specialists excited for the first time in a while about potential “breakthroughs” for a disorder that has been difficult to diagnose and treat. In one report, a blood test for sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), using detection of autoantibodies against a newly discovered protein, identified the disease in 72 percent of cases and, of those identified, correctly predicted the disease 92 percent of the time. And in a second report, treatment with a monoclonal antibody led to gains in thigh muscle volume and suggestions of improved function, specifically with walking.

In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, discuss what's known about the clinical phenotype of sIBM and how it's currently diagnosed, as well as the two different “camps” in thinking about its underlying mechanism — whether there is an inflammatory or degenerative process. Hear more about the current standards for treatment and their shortcomings, as well as why the findings from the new report — the increase in thigh muscle volume and the suggestion of additional improvements in function — are potential breakthroughs: http://bit.ly/aNQ4KB.

For more discussion, read the Nov. 21 Neurology Today reports from the ANA meeting: “Blood Test for IBM Shows High Specificity...” and “And a Monoclonal Antibody Treatment Helps with Muscle Volume in sIBM”: neurotodayonline.com.

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