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Neurology Today:
doi: 10.1097/01.NT.0000435585.63041.b8
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TUNE IN, JOIN IN THE DIALOGUE: How should clinicians respond to a new study finding an association of high glucose with an elevated risk for dementia?

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TUNE IN, JOIN IN THE DIALOGUE: How should clinicians respond to a new study finding an association of high glucose with an elevated risk for dementia? The study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, found an elevated risk for dementia even when blood sugar levels were far into the normal range, well below levels associated with diabetes or even prediabetes. Non-fasting glucose values of 100 mg/dL were associated with a higher risk for dementia than non-fasting glucose values of 90 mg/dL

In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, discuss the findings — and offer some caveats: among them, this was an association study and the measures compared are cognitive screening every two years and the average of all glucoses drawn over that time — many variables could be influencing these results. And there is some ambiguity — for example, it's difficult to discriminate reliably among causes of dementia in this study. Still, the study raises many questions about how neurologists could or should be managing diabetes as a comorbidity, and whether clinicians should be thinking of the brain as another organ with the potential for end organ damage. Read the Sept. 19 Neurology Today story, “High Glucose Levels Associated with increased Risk for Dementia”: http://bit.ly/7qKpuK and watch the video commentary: http://bit.ly/aNQ4KB.

Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

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