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Neurology Today:
doi: 10.1097/01.NT.0000433505.72423.25
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TUNE IN: SHOULD CLINICIANS AGGRESSIVELY LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGE?

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TUNE IN: SHOULD CLINICIANS AGGRESSIVELY LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGE? That was the question for the second Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial (INTERACT 2), which reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that rapid intensive lowering of blood pressure (BP) does not appear to reduce death or severe disability in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. The international multicenter trial, which accrued 2,839 patients at 144 hospitals in 21 countries, randomized participants to either intensive treatment to lower their blood pressure (with a target systolic level of <140 mm Hg within 1 hour) or guideline-recommended treatment (with a target systolic level of <180 mm Hg) with the use of agents of the physician's choosing. But while the BP lowering did not appear to have an effect on the primary outcomes, an analysis of modified Rankin scores indicated that patients who underwent intensive blood pressure BP-lowering had improved functional outcomes. What is the clinical “take-home” message from these mixed findings? In a video interview, Neurology Today Editor-in-chief Steven P. Ringel, MD, and Associate Editor Robert Holloway, MD, discuss the study results, and debate the pros and cons of aggressive blood pressure lowering in the setting of acute intracranial stroke. Click here for Neurology Today's full coverage of the INTERACT 2 study: http://bit.ly/7qKpuK.

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