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Patterns of Aneurysm Recurrence After Microsurgical Clip Obliteration

Spiotta, Alejandro M. MD*; Hui, Ferdinand MD§; Schuette, Albert MD; Moskowitz, Shaye I. MD, PhD‡,§

Neurosurgery:
doi: 10.1227/NEU.0b013e318276b46b
Research-Human-Clinical Trials
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Microsurgical clip obliteration remains a time-honored and viable option for the treatment of select aneurysms with very low rates of recurrence.

OBJECTIVE: We studied previously clipped aneurysms that were found to have recurrences to better understand the patterns and configurations of these rare entities.

METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of 2 prospectively maintained databases of aneurysm treatments from 2 institutions spanning 14 years to identify patients with recurrence of previously clipped intracranial aneurysms.

RESULTS: Twenty-six aneurysm recurrences were identified. Three types of recurrence were identified: type I, proximal to the clip tines; type II, distal; and type III, lateral. The most common type of recurrence was that arising distal to the clip tines (46.1%), and the least frequently encountered recurrence was that arising proximal to the tines (19.2%). Laterally located recurrences were found in 34.6% of cases.

CONCLUSION: We describe 3 different patterns of aneurysm recurrence with respect to clip application: those occurring proximal, distal, or lateral to the clip tines.

ABBREVIATION: SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage

Author Information

*Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

Department of Neurosurgery

§Cerebrovascular Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio

Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia

Correspondence: Alejandro M. Spiotta, MD, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, 301 CSB, Charleston, SC 29425. E-mail: spiotta@musc.edu

Received May 10, 2012

Accepted September 14, 2012

Copyright © by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons