Home Current Issue Previous Issues Published Ahead-of-Print Supplements Collections Podcasts Video Journal Info
Skip Navigation LinksHome > March 2011 - Volume 68 - Issue 3 > What Factors Predict the Response of Larger Brain Metastases...
Neurosurgery:
doi: 10.1227/NEU.0b013e318207a58b
Research-Human-Clinical Studies

What Factors Predict the Response of Larger Brain Metastases to Radiosurgery?

Yang, Huai-che MD*§; Kano, Hideyuki MD, PhD*‡; Lunsford, L Dade MD*‡; Niranjan, Ajay MCh*‡; Flickinger, John C MD*†; Kondziolka, Douglas MD*‡

Collapse Box

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Approximately 20 to 40% of patients with systemic malignancies develop brain metastases.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the potential role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for larger metastatic brain tumors, we reviewed our recent experience.

METHODS: Between 2004 and 2008, 70 patients with a metastatic brain tumor larger than 3 cm in maximum diameter underwent Gamma knife SRS. Thirty-three patients had received previous whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and 37 received only SRS.

RESULTS: The overall median follow-up was 8.1 months. At the first planned imaging follow-up at 2 months, 29 (41%) tumors had >50% volume reduction, 22 (31%) had 10 to 50% volume reduction, and 19 (28%) were stable or larger. We also evaluated brain edema using MRI T2 images. In 11 patients (16%) the peritumoral edema volume was reduced by more than 50%, in 25 (36%) it was reduced by 10 to 50%, in 21 (30%) it was stable, and in 13 (19%) it was increased. Twenty (36%) discontinued corticosteroids by the time of first imaging follow-up. Because of persistent symptoms, 7 patients (10%) required a craniotomy to remove the tumor. Tumor volume reduction (>50%) was associated with a single metastasis (P = .012), no previous WBRT (P = .002), and a tumor volume <16 cm3 (P = .002). The better peritumoral edema volume reduction (>50%) was associated with a single metastasis (P = .024), no previous WBRT (P = .05), and breast cancer histology (P = .044).

CONCLUSION: Surgical resection remains the primary approach for larger brain metastases if feasible. Tumor volume is a better indicator than maximum diameter. Tumor volume and edema responded better in patients who underwent SRS alone.

Copyright © by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

Login

Article Tools

Share

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.