October/November 2016 - Volume 12 - Issue 5
pp: 4-40

From the Editor


Letters


The Waiting Room


Tuned In: After a researcher approached a group of people with Parkinson's disease to start a choir, a series of small miracles unfolded.

Bolster, Henry

Neurology Now. 12(5):8-9, October/November 2016.

This Way In: When a researcher asks a Parkinson's disease support group to form a choir, small miracles unfold.

Living Well


Self-Diagnose Successfully: Patients sometimes understand their baffling conditions better than their physicians. Learn how to build a convincing case and work with your doctor to ...

Laliberte, Richard

Neurology Now. 12(5):16-20, October/November 2016.

People with rare or baffling conditions offer tips on how to do your own research and work with doctors to find answers.

Ask the Experts


Pictures of You


Coming Out: Artist Paula Hayes, 57, hopes speaking publicly about her epilepsy will help lessen the stigma around the disease.

Bolster, Mary

Neurology Now. 12(5):38, October/November 2016.

Artist Paula Hayes, 57, says being open about her epilepsy is more important than ever.

Resource Central


Speak Up


Aliens in the Machine: Yearly MRIs can detect spinal tumors, but they don't tell the author how to live between scans.

Bostian, Ida L.

Neurology Now. 12(5):40, October/November 2016.

Yearly MRIs can detect spinal tumors, but they can't tell the author how to live between scans.


Kimberly Williams-Paisley


Shining A Light: Actress Kimberly Williams-Paisley wants to help other families dealing with primary progressive aphasia avoid the mistakes she and her family made in caring for...

Bolster, Mary; Roberts-Grey, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(5):24-27, October/November 2016.

Actress Kimberly Williams-Paisley wants to help other families dealing with primary progressive aphasia avoid the mistakes her family made in caring for her mother

Stroke


Stronger After Stroke: Fifty years ago, doctors and researchers thought recovery from stroke was limited. Today, they know that survivors have a lot more control over their own...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(5):32-37, October/November 2016.

Fifty years ago, doctors and researchers thought recovery from stroke was limited. Today, they know that survivors have a lot more control over their own recovery. Here's how to ensure the best possible outcome.

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