August-September 2011 - Volume 7 - Issue 4
pp: 3-40

From the Editor


Letters


The Waiting Room


Living Well


The Heart Is a Muscle: Why the Gimbel brothers aren't waiting around for a muscular dystrophy cure.

Talan, Jamie

Neurology Now. 7(4):32,34, August-September 2011.

The Gimbel brothers haven't let Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a fatal genetic disease, cause them to lose heart.

Your Questions Answered


Resource Central


Brain Tumor Resources

Stephens, Stephanie

Neurology Now. 7(4):36, August-September 2011.

Where to go for more information on the topics discussed in this issue of Neurology Now and for a directory of patient advocacy organizations.

Dyslexia: The Basics

Farley, Todd

Neurology Now. 7(4):36, August-September 2011.

Where to go for more information on the topics discussed in this issue of Neurology Now and for a directory of patient advocacy organizations.

Muscular Dystrophy Treatments

Talan, Jamie

Neurology Now. 7(4):39, August-September 2011.

Where to go for more information on the topics discussed in this issue of Neurology Now and for a directory of patient advocacy organizations.

Speak Up


How to Minister With Migraine: what I've learned over the course of 50 years.

Smalkowski, Frances

Neurology Now. 7(4):40, August-September 2011.

One woman's story of finding spiritual understanding in her 50-year struggle with hormonal migraines.


Chuck Close


Larger Than Life: Dyslexia, paralysis, face blindness—nothing comes between legendary artist Chuck Close and his canvas, except a brush.

Farley, Todd

Neurology Now. 7(4):14-16,18-19, August-September 2011.

World-renowned artist Chuck Close is as complex as his intricate paintings. Equipped with an arsenal of color and vast blank canvases, Close uses his neurologic conditions—dyslexia, face blindness, paralysis—as an impetus to paint with greater depth and richness. “Everything in my work is directly related to my learning disabilities,” he says.

Brain Tumor


The Science of Survival: No magic bullet exists to cure the brain tumors known as gliomas, but scientists continue to advance diagnosis and treatment.

Stephens, Stephanie

Neurology Now. 7(4):25-28,30, August-September 2011.

A diagnosis of malignant brain tumor can be terrifying—neither surgery, radiation, nor chemotherapy can completely eliminate this kind of tumor. But ongoing research continues to advance diagnosis and treatment for brain-tumor patients.