Articles by Gina Shaw

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Stimulating the Brain: Researchers are studying the use of deep brain stimulation to treat Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and depression, among other disorders. Here's a look at the ...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 13(5):42-45, October/November 2017.

Researchers are testing deep brain stimulation for disorders other than tremor and Parkinson's disease.

Off to Camp: Don't let your child's neurologic disorder keep him or her from enjoying sleepaway camp. Our guide will help you find the perfect match.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 13(2):24-31, April/May 2017.

Don't let your child's neurologic condition keep him or her from enjoying sleepaway camp. Our guide will help you find the perfect match.

Smart Choices: Follow this expert guide to choosing an appropriate disease-modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 13(1):48-53, February/March 2017.

Read our experts' guide to choosing an appropriate disease-modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis.

Sexual Healing: A neurologic diagnosis doesn't mean the end of intimacy. These experts say imagination, communication, and a focus on pleasure can keep it alive.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(6):46-49, December/January 2016.

A neurologic diagnosis doesn't mean the end of intimacy. Experts say imagination, communication, and a focus on pleasure can keep it alive.

Stem Cell Reality: Desperate patients are vulnerable to the promise of stem cell therapy—most of it unproven. Protect your health—and your wallet—with these facts.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(6):50-53, December/January 2016.

The promise of stem cell therapy is tantalizing but unproven. We separate the hope from the hype.

Stronger After Stroke: Fifty years ago, doctors and researchers thought recovery from stroke was limited. Today, they know that survivors have a lot more control over their own...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(5):32-37, October/November 2016.

Fifty years ago, doctors and researchers thought recovery from stroke was limited. Today, they know that survivors have a lot more control over their own recovery. Here's how to ensure the best possible outcome.

Back from the Brink: People with certain neurologic conditions are more likely to commit suicide than the general population. Here's how friends, family, and caregivers can reduce ...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(2):26-31, April/May 2016.

Suicide is a risk factor for people with neurologic conditions. Here's how to lower that risk.

Solving Medical Mysteries: The National Institutes of Health has created a network of medical centers dedicated to diagnosing rare diseases.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(1):8-9, February/March 2016.

This Way In: As part of the Undiagnosed Diseases Network, doctors help solve medical mysteries.

Pressure Drop: New evidence suggests low blood pressure may hasten mental decline in elderly people at risk for dementia.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(1):9-17, February/March 2016.

Neurology News: Is low blood pressure always a benefit? Not for the elderly at risk of dementia.

Brain Boost: For people who have persistent symptoms after a traumatic brain injury, a cognitive training program may help.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(1):18, February/March 2016.

Neurology News: Learn how people may improve brain function even 10 years after a traumatic brain injury

Holiday Gifts: Grief and loss may dampen celebrations after a neurologic diagnosis, but people who've been there say they experience joy and humor, too. Here's how to remain open...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(6):38-42, December/January 2015.

Grief and loss may dampen celebrations after a neurologic diagnosis, but there can still be joy and humor. Learn how to remain open to all of it.

Calm the Chaos: Psychiatric and mood disorders are common among people with Tourette syndrome. The key is to diagnose and treat them early.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(5):14-17, October/November 2015.

This Way In: Psychiatric disorders commonly occur with Tourette syndrome. Treating these conditions early can make a difference.

Out of Isolation: When actress Madeleine Stowe's father was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in the 1960s, the family had few options and little support. Today, Stowe is offering ...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(4):24-27, August/September 2015.

Actress Madeleine Stowe opens up about her father's experience with multiple sclerosis (MS) and how her family managed—and encourages others with MS to reach out and support each other.

The Dating Game: Finding a date is always daunting. When you have a neurologic condition, it can be overwhelming. We sought advice from people who've been there to help you...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(3):24-33, June/July 2015.

When you have a neurologic condition, dating can be tricky. We sought advice from people who've been there to help you navigate the challenges.

Advocacy: Live Your Best LifeFinding cures for chronic neurologic diseases is a top priority, but patients and advocates say research on living well with these conditions is just...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(2):13, April/May 2015.

Advocacy Patients and advocates say research on how to improve their day-to-day lives is essential.

A Leader Takes on Brain Disease: Two personal tragedies spur former Vice President Walter F. Mondale's support for aggressive brain research.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(2):18-23, April/May 2015.

Spurred by personal loss, former Vice President Walter F. Mondale is aggressively supporting brain research.

This Way In: Caucusing for CuresA legislator's personal history fuels his commitment to raising funds for medical innovation.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(1):12-13, February/March 2015.

This Way In: Why one legislator is on a mission to raise funds for medical innovation.

Follow the Money: The Ice Bucket Challenge raised big bucks on social media. Now, the ALS Association tells us where that cold, hard cash is going.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(1):26-33, February/March 2015.

The ALS Association tells us where the cold, hard cash from the Ice Bucket Challenge is going.

There's No Place Like Home: Before you modify your living space to accommodate a neurologic condition, consult these expert tips to make sure your alterations are smart and safe.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(1):42-43, February/March 2015.

Follow these important guidelines before you modify your living space to accommodate a neurologic condition.

A Pipeline for Hope: Cracking the genetic code of childhood epilepsy.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 10(6):48-55, December/January 2014.

A national research consortium hopes to unravel the genetics of rare childhood epilepsies and find treatments for children like Natasha Fischer.

The Keys to Safety: How neurologic conditions affect driving.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 10(5):14-16, October/November 2014.

Having a neurologic disorder doesn't necessarily mean giving up the car keys. We speak to experts about how common neurologic conditions impact driving, and what you can do to stay safe.

Tracking Traumatic Brain Injury: What new biomarkers may reveal about concussion over the short and long term.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 10(3):24-31, June/July 2014.

What do new biomarkers reveal about the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concussion? In this article, we explain the imaging technology currently available to diagnose TBI—as well as the ongoing research on risk factors, and the short- and long-term consequences of brain injuries.

A Mother's Love

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 10(1):28-32, February/March 2014.

Tracy Dixon-Salazar was a stay-at-home mom until her toddler, Savannah, started experiencing uncontrolled and frequent seizures, which turned out to be symptoms of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. In search of treatment, Dixon-Salazar set out on a journey that took her from junior college to a Ph.D. in neuroscience. As a genetic researcher, Dr. Dixon-Salazar has found a way to reduce Savannah's seizures dramatically.

You've Survived a TBI, but Will Your Marriage?

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 9(6):20-23, December/January 2013.

Medicine has made great strides in prolonging the life expectancy of people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). “Where we haven't come a long way is on psychological recovery and sustaining relationships,” says Jeffrey Kreutzer, Ph.D. Here, couples discuss recovery after severe TBI.

Heading Off Migraine: What's the evidence for non-pharmaceutical approaches?

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 8(3):23-30, June-july 2012.

For many people with migraine, prescription and over-the-counter drugs just don't cut it. Here, we provide expert opinion on a range of complementary treatments for migraine headache, such as vitamins, supplements, biofeedback, acupuncture, and avoidance of triggers.

Neurology News: Neurologists asked to probe for violence

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 8(1):10, February-march 2012.

Neurology News: A position statement from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) on signs of abuse in patients, a new guideline on the interaction of HIV drugs and anti-epilepsy drugs, and information on the AAN's upcoming Brain Health Fair.

Neurology News: Drugs for epilepsy and for HIV can interact negatively

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 8(1):13, February-march 2012.

Neurology News: A position statement from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) on signs of abuse in patients, a new guideline on the interaction of HIV drugs and anti-epilepsy drugs, and information on the AAN's upcoming Brain Health Fair.

Dementia in the Workplace: How long should someone with dementia keep working?

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 7(6):30-33, December-January 2011.

After being diagnosed with dementia, how long should a person wait to stop working? Recent headlines—like the announcement by Pat Summitt that she would continue to coach the University of Tennessee women's basketball team—have thrust this question into the national spotlight.

When the Nose Doesn't Know

SHAW, GINA

Neurology Now. 6(5):22-23,27-29, September-October 2010.

When the Nose Doesn't Know: Once smell and taste are lost, their importance in everyday life—from detecting spoiled food, to warning of a fire, to enjoying a meal—becomes obvious. Here, a neurologist who shares his patients' loss of smell and taste offers advice on how best to cope with this underappreciated problem.

Making Sense of Brain Death

SHAW, GINA

Neurology Now. 6(3):28-29,33-34, May-June 2010.

What exactly is “brain death?” The concept usually isn't explained very well by doctors or the media, leading to fear that people in comas will be declared dead prematurely. Nothing could be further from the truth. Here, we clear up confusion about what brain death is—and is not—and what its relationship is to organ donation.

Of Mice and Humans

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 6(1):23-25, January-February 2010.

Animal research has been instrumental in developing treatments for multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, stroke, and other neurological disorders. But some animal rights organizations are pushing to have animals given the same legal standing as humans, which would effectively ban all animal research since animals cannot give “informed consent.”

Fibromyalgia: Is Fibromyalgia Real?

SHAW, GINA

Neurology Now. 5(5):29-32, September-October 2009.

Fibromyalgia used to be a “wastebasket” diagnosis for patients with unexplained pain and fatigue. Today, more and more neurologists are acknowledging that fibromyalgia is a real disorder, and one that should be treated by neurologists who care for chronic pain—not only the rheumatologists who originally identified the condition some 100 years ago.

The Great Brain

SHAW, GINA

Neurology Now. 5(2):14-17, March-April 2009.

Computer programmer, entrepreneur, Jimi Hendrix superfan, “venture philanthropist”—Paul Allen wears a lot of hats. He also founded the Allen Institute for Brain Science in 2003 to help find cures for neurological illnesses. This year the AAN is honoring Allen with their Public Leadership in Neurology award.

Battling the Black Dog

SHAW, GINA

Neurology Now. 3(4):20-25, July-August 2007.

Many neurological disorders go hand in hand with depression, which can influence the course of your condition in powerful ways. Here's what to look for and what to do if you are living with—or caring for someone with—epilepsy, MS, Parkinson's, or migraine.

Dementia Therapy Goes to the Dogs

SHAW, GINA

Neurology Now. 3(2):28-31, March-April 2007.

Pet therapy offers emotional, cognitive, and social benefits for people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

Diagnosing and treating early,Stage alzheimer's

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 3(1):14-22, January-February 2007.

A visit to a leading Alzheimer's center and an active support group provides insight on the road to diagnosis and treatment.

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