Stroke & Neurovascular Disease

Created:   7/21/2009
Contains:  145 items
This collection contains articles on stroke. Sign up to receive an alert by email or RSS when new articles, podcasts, video, blog posts, and letters to the editor on stroke are added to this collection: Go to the "Collection Alerts" box in the right-hand column.

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Stronger After Stroke: Fifty years ago, doctors and researchers thought recovery from stroke was limited. Today, they know that survivors have a lot more control over their own...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(5):32-37, October/November 2016.

Fifty years ago, doctors and researchers thought recovery from stroke was limited. Today, they know that survivors have a lot more control over their own recovery. Here's how to ensure the best possible outcome.

Remote Control: Telemedicine is revolutionizing the treatment of stroke. In the future, it may do the same for other neurologic conditions. Here's how it works.

Auchard, Emily Brower

Neurology Now. 12(4):34-37, August/September 2016.

Telemedicine is revolutionizing the treatment of stroke and other neurologic diseases. Find out how it works.

Balancing Act: Unsteadiness is a common symptom of many neurologic conditions, causing falls and injuries. These strategies can help boost your balance—and your brain health.

Paturel, Amy

Neurology Now. 12(3):30-33, June/July 2016.

Unsteadiness is a common symptom of many neurologic conditions, causing falls and injuries. These strategies can help boost your balance—and your brain health.

Sick Before Their Time: When diseases that typically occur in adults affect children, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery can be daunting. Advice from families, patients, and other ...

Pompilio, Natalie

Neurology Now. 12(3):18-23, June/July 2016.

When diseases that typically occur in adults affect children, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery can be daunting. Advice from families, patients, and other experts can ease the journey.

Drink to your Health: A daily glass of wine or bottle of beer may protect against stroke, Parkinson's disease, and cognitive decline, research suggests.

Stephens, Stephanie

Neurology Now. 12(1):19, February/March 2016.

Neurology News: A daily glass of red wine may promote brain health.

6 Questions About Blood Pressure: A recent trial recommends a lower blood pressure target to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes. A stroke expert interprets the results.

Hiscott, Rebecca

Neurology Now. 12(1):17, February/March 2016.

Ask Your Doctor: Important questions about lower blood pressure recommendations.

Pressure Drop: New evidence suggests low blood pressure may hasten mental decline in elderly people at risk for dementia.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(1):9-17, February/March 2016.

Neurology News: Is low blood pressure always a benefit? Not for the elderly at risk of dementia.

Dementia 101: Not all dementia is Alzheimer's disease. Knowing the difference affects planning, management, and prognosis. Our primer breaks down the four most common types, as...

Cohen, Marisa

Neurology Now. 11(6):44-51, December/January 2015.

Not all dementia is Alzheimer's disease. Knowing the difference affects planning, management, and prognosis. Our primer explains the differences.

Readers Like Me: We asked 10 subscribers who have been with Neurology Now for 10 years to share their stories. Here's what they told us.

Hiscott, Rebecca

Neurology Now. 11(2):28-31, April/May 2015.

We asked 10 subscribers who have been with Neurology Now since the beginning to share their stories. Here's what they told us.

Hitting the Books: Having lost her ability to read because of a stroke, acclaimed writer Esmeralda Santiago began the difficult but familiar process of learning a new language.

Farley, Todd

Neurology Now. 10(4):16-23, August/September 2014.

Acclaimed writer Esmeralda Santiago, author of the memoir When I Was Puerto Rican and novels including America's Dream, The Turkish Lover, and Conquistadora, is a master storyteller. But when a stroke damaged her ability to read, she began the difficult but familiar process of learning a new language.

This Way In: New Guideline for Preventing Stroke in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

Dolan, Darrach

Neurology Now. 10(4):12-13, August/September 2014.

This Way In: A new guideline from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) on preventing stroke in people with atrial fibrillation.

NIH StrokeNet: How the NINDS is improving and accelerating clinical trials for stroke.

Valeo, Tom

Neurology Now. 10(2):36-38, April/May 2014.

How the National Institutes of Health Stroke Trials Network is revolutionizing clinical trials and improving stroke care.

Navigating the Complexities of Stroke

Collier, Andrea King

Neurology Now. 9(4):21-23, August/September 2013.

Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke. But with specialized care, advances in treatment, and better public education, neurologists hope to reduce the number of strokes and improve quality of life for survivors. With these goals in mind, the American Academy of Neurology recently published Navigating the Complexities of Stroke.

The Brain Needs Blood: Vascular cognitive impairment, one of the most common forms of dementia, may be preventable.

Paturel, Amy

Neurology Now. 9(1):27-30, February-March 2013.

Often mistaken for Alzheimer's disease, vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is one of the most common forms of cognitive impairment and dementia. The good news? VCI may be preventable. Learn how VCI is diagnosed and treated, what research is in the works, and how VCI might be prevented.

Age Is Just a Number: Young adult stroke is one the rise. Here's what you should know.

Stephens, Stephani

Neurology Now. 9(1):19-26, February-March 2013.

The number of young adults who have strokes is on the rise. “The data are particularly relevant given the U.S. and global epidemics of obesity and diabetes,” says Aneesh B. Singhal, M.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital. In this article, read about Dana Hokin, who had a stroke at the age of 44, and learn what you can do to reduce your stroke risk—at any age.

The Signs of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

Neurology Now. 7(5):79, October/November 2011.

Where to go for more information on the topics discussed in this issue of Neurology Now and for a directory of patient advocacy organizations.

Ask the Experts: What treatments are available for Moyamoya disease?

Zuccarello, Mario

Neurology Now. 7(5):68, October/November 2011.

Answers to readers' questions about plasmapheresis for myasthenia gravis, Moyamoya disease, and the effects of radiation on the brain and spinal cord.

Hidden Hercules: Actor Kevin Sorbo reveals his secret battle with stroke.

Childers, Linda

Neurology Now. 7(5):26-28,30-31, October/November 2011.

Kevin Sorbo is best known for his television portrayal of Hercules, a muscle-bound hero who battles the forces of evil. Unbeknownst to his fans, Sorbo was also waging a secret battle—on and off the set—after a series of strokes left him partially blind and incapacitated at 38 years old. “I went through two years of hell before I began to feel like myself again,” Sorbo says. now, the actor has discovered a different kind of strength.

Larger Than Life: Dyslexia, paralysis, face blindness—nothing comes between legendary artist Chuck Close and his canvas, except a brush.

Farley, Todd

Neurology Now. 7(4):14-16,18-19, August/September 2011.

World-renowned artist Chuck Close is as complex as his intricate paintings. Equipped with an arsenal of color and vast blank canvases, Close uses his neurologic conditions—dyslexia, face blindness, paralysis—as an impetus to paint with greater depth and richness. “Everything in my work is directly related to my learning disabilities,” he says.

The ABCs of Aphasia: Understanding aphasia is crucial to recovery—for patients and caregivers.

Carr, Coeli

Neurology Now. 7(3):35-38, June/July 2011.

Losing the power of speech can lead to intense feelings of frustration, isolation, and depression. But with speech, group, and music therapy—as well as determination on the part of patients and caregivers—there is reason for optimism. Here, individuals affected by aphasia share their stories of struggle and triumph.

Of Doctors and Data: In recommending treatments, neurologists must combine the best available evidence with their clinical judgment. What does this mean for you?

Valeo, Tom

Neurology Now. 6(6):27-30, November/December 2010.

In recommending treatments, neurologists must do more than rely on what their predecessors did: They must combine the best available evidence with their clinical judgment. But what does this mean for you? Top neurologists explain how “evidence-based medicine” can help you get better care.

Mind Games: Computerized cognitive exercise is big business. But do the industry's claims stand up?

Paturel, Amy

Neurology Now. 6(4):26-27,32-34, July/August 2010.

With the first wave of baby boomers now past 60, scientists (and manufacturers) are working around the clock to come up with computerized programs to help keep the brain in shape. The brain games business is booming, but do the industry's claims stand up? And what do neurologists recommend for improving cognitive fitness?

Lupus and Your Heart: Two's a crowd when it comes to lupus and cardiovascular problems.

Stephens, Stephanie

Neurology Now. 6(4):19,23-25, July/August 2010.

Most people have heard of lupus. You might even know someone who has it—1.5 million Americans do. But few people understand what lupus is or how profoundly it can affect the heart. Here's what you should know.

Making Sense of Brain Death

SHAW, GINA

Neurology Now. 6(3):28-29,33-34, May/June 2010.

What exactly is “brain death?” The concept usually isn't explained very well by doctors or the media, leading to fear that people in comas will be declared dead prematurely. Nothing could be further from the truth. Here, we clear up confusion about what brain death is—and is not—and what its relationship is to organ donation.

Walk This Way

PATUREL, AMY

Neurology Now. 6(3):23-27, May/June 2010.

Problems with gait (how a person walks) are pervasive across neurologic disease. While the area of the brain that's affected may differ depending on whether a person has Parkinson's disease, stroke, or multiple sclerosis, the end result is the same: a loss of mobility and independence. But treadmill training can get you moving again.

Cindy's Campaign

CHILDERS, LINDA

Neurology Now. 6(3):16-19, May/June 2010.

Cindy mcCain was the picture of sophistication as she traveled the country supporting her husband in his bid for the 2008 presidency. yet behind mcCain's smile, the mother of four was often fighting horrendous migraines, a condition that has plagued her for 15 years and may have played a part in the stroke she suffered in 2004.

Depression and Resilience

COOPER, ANDREA

Neurology Now. 6(2):18-25, March/April 2010.

Depression is a frequent companion of both neurological disease and caregiving, but there are effective ways to treat this common condition. “Treated vigorously enough, the vast majority of people will get better,” says Peter Kramer, M.D. Read on for the lowdown on feeling low—and information on how to boost your resilience in the face of life's challenges.

Ask the Experts: Your Questions Answered—Stroke and Depression

Chaturvedi, Seemant

Neurology Now. 6(1):32, January/February 2010.

Answers to your questions about polymyositis, spinal tap, stroke and depression, and Guillain-Barré Syndrome.

Of Mice and Humans

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 6(1):23-25, January/February 2010.

Animal research has been instrumental in developing treatments for multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, stroke, and other neurological disorders. But some animal rights organizations are pushing to have animals given the same legal standing as humans, which would effectively ban all animal research since animals cannot give “informed consent.”

The “Other” Dementias

VALEO, TOM

Neurology Now. 5(6):26-27,31-34, November/December 2009.

Everyone has heard of Alzheimer's, which accounts for 65 percent of all dementia in the United States. But more than 100 causes of dementia exist. Here, we take a look at the “big four”: Alzheimer's, frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body dementia, and vascular dementia. Knowing them may help you or your loved one get the right treatment.

Who's There?: When stroke or Alzheimer's changes a person's behavior, caregiving can become extreme. Here, experienced caregivers, patients, and experts share their stories and...

STEPHENS, STEPHANIE

Neurology Now. 5(4):26-29, July/August 2009.

When stroke or Alzheimer's changes a person's behavior, caregiving can become extreme. Who is this person you've known all your life? And how do you handle the agitation, increased aggression, paranoia, and even psychosis that can accompany a neurological condition like dementia? Read on for practical tips from experts, caregivers, and the cared-for.

Your Heart, Your Belly and Alzheimer's: People with so‐called “metabolic syndrome” may be at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Here's what you should...

PATUREL, AMY

Neurology Now. 5(4):18-19,23-25, July/August 2009.

People with “metabolic syndrome”—obesity, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and diabetes—may be at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's and dementia. Controlling these risk factors might help prevent or slow disease progression—but the time to act is now.

Black, White, & Gray

COLLIER, ANDREA KING

Neurology Now. 5(3):18-19,23-24, May/June 2009.

African Americans are more likely than their white counterparts to suffer and die from a stroke, more likely to suffer a stroke at a younger age, and often take longer to recover than whites. Researchers are just starting to find out why.

No Joke

CHILDERS, LINDA

Neurology Now. 5(3):13-14,17, May/June 2009.

Actor Robert Guillaume has had many memorable roles, including Nathan Detroit in Guys and Dolls and the witty butler Benson DuBois on Soap and Benson. Here, the veteran actor remembers the day a stroke changed his life—and the warnings he didn't take seriously enough.

Your Brain on Ice

TALAN, JAMIE

Neurology Now. 5(2):26-29, March/April 2009.

Cooling the body after cardiac arrest or stroke can save precious brain function. In Europe, cooling has become the standard of care for cardiac arrest. In the U.S., “It's a complete hit or miss,” says Stephan Mayer, M.D., who runs a cooling unit, “depending on where you live and where the ambulance takes you.” Here's what you should know about cooling's risks and benefits.

Hidden Pressure

Smolinsky, Michael

Neurology Now. 4(5):23-26, September/October 2008.

Adult normal pressure hydrocephalus is often misdiagnosed as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease—or simply chalked up to aging. But it is a reversible condition, and thanks to advances in shunt technology, the treatments are safer than ever before.

Beauty and the Brain

CAJIGAL, STEPHANIE

Neurology Now. 4(3):14-16, May/June 2008.

Despite her pin-up allure, Morgan Fairchild knows the most important part of a woman is her brain. That's why she has teamed up with the American Academy of Neurology, the American College of Emergency Physicians, and the American Stroke Association to raise awareness about stroke. Learn more about the “Give Me 5 For Stroke” campaign in “Beauty and the Brain.”

Brain Food

PATUREL, AMY

Neurology Now. 4(2):18-19,23-25, March/April 2008.

A number of recent studies have suggested that following a Mediterranean-style diet can lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation in the body, and protect against conditions such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. Learn the basics of eating Mediterranean and try our delicious recipe for Sicilian-style tuna. For more brainfriendly recipes, go to neurologynow.com.

Tedy Bruschi's Post‐stroke Return to the NFL.

Farley, Todd

Neurology Now. 4(2):15-17, March/April 2008.

At thirty-one years of age, New England Patriot Tedy Bruschi had just helped the Patriots win their third of the previous four Super Bowls and been selected to his sport's all-star game, the Pro Bowl. At the peak of his physical powers, the linebacker never imagined he was a candidate for stroke. Now, as the first stroke survivor to return to a career in professional football, Bruschi is using his celebrity to raise awareness about the leading cause of disability in the U.S.

Tedy Bruschi's Post‐stroke Return to the NFL.

Farley, Todd

Neurology Now. 4(2):15-17, March/April 2008.

At thirty-one years of age, New England Patriot Tedy Bruschi had just helped the Patriots win their third of the previous four Super Bowls and been selected to his sport's all-star game, the Pro Bowl. At the peak of his physical powers, the linebacker never imagined he was a candidate for stroke. Now, as the first stroke survivor to return to a career in professional football, Bruschi is using his celebrity to raise awareness about the leading cause of disability in the U.S.

Unchained By Melody

COOPER, ANDREA

Neurology Now. 4(1):16-19, January/February 2008.

To say that Oliver Sacks, M.D., is one of the best-known doctors in the world doesn't do him justice. The author of numerous New York Times bestsellers—including Awakenings, which inspired the movie with Robin Williams and Robert De Niro —Dr. Sacks is a rock star among neurologists. In his latest book, he reflects on the powerful role of music in the lives of people with neurological disorders, including his own.

Avoiding Caregiver Burnout

OLSEN, PAT

Neurology Now. 3(6):28,31-32, November/December 2007.

Caregiving is equal opportunity employment, if also a labor of love. And if you aren't careful, it can burn you out. Here's how not to lose your wits when cooking, cleaning, driving to doctors, paying bills, putting pills in little boxes, and taking care of someone you love.

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