Alzheimer's & Dementia

Created:   7/21/2009
Contains:  197 items
This collection contains articles on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, such as vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and others. Sign up to receive an alert by email or RSS when new articles, podcasts, video, blog posts, and letters to the editor on Alzheimer's disease or other dementias are added to this collection: Go to the "Collection Alerts" box in the right-hand column.

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Role of a Lifetime: Since her mother's diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, actress Marcia Gay Harden has become passionate about raising awareness and advocating for research.

Childers, Linda

Neurology Now. 13(2):20-23, April/May 2017.

Since her mother's diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, actress Marcia Gay Harden has become passionate about raising awareness and advocating for research.

Puzzle Power: As Lewy body dementia narrowed their father's world, his twin daughters discovered an activity that brought him hours of joy.

Dalgarn, Mindy; Dalgarn, Missy

Neurology Now. 13(1):56, February/March 2017.

Puzzles allow twin daughters to connect with their father after he is diagnosed with Lewy body dementia.

Protect Your Brain for Life: Follow these expert strategies to guard against injury and cognitive decline throughout your life.

Cohen, Marisa

Neurology Now. 13(1):38-47, February/March 2017.

Follow these smart strategies to guard against injury and cognitive decline throughout your life.

The Alzheimer's Café: In memory cafés popping up around the country, people with dementia and their caregivers can socialize without fear of stigma.

Kritz, Fran

Neurology Now. 12(4):8-9, August/September 2016.

Advocacy: Memory cafés allow people with Alzheimer's disease to socialize without fear of stigma.

Stop the Scam: Elderly parents or family members with cognitive impairments are especially vulnerable to financial abuse. Safeguard your loved ones with these strategies.

Kunkle, Fredrick

Neurology Now. 12(3):27-29, June/July 2016.

Elderly parents or family members with cognitive impairments are especially vulnerable to financial abuse. Our expert advice will help keep loved ones safe and solvent.

Conversation Starter: After her father's diagnosis, Maria Shriver started talking about Alzheimer's disease. Ten years later, she's still talking, and people are beginning to pay...

Roberts-Grey, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(3):14-17, June/July 2016.

After her father's diagnosis, Maria Shriver started talking about Alzheimer's disease. Ten years later, she's still talking, and people are beginning to pay attention.

Healing Tails: Service and therapy dogs can transform the lives of people with neurologic conditions such as epilepsy, autism, and multiple sclerosis. Dog owners and other experts ...

Pompilio, Natalie

Neurology Now. 12(1):46-55, February/March 2016.

Service dogs can transform lives for people with epilepsy, autism, and multiple sclerosis. Learn more about their potential benefits.

Weighty Matters: Obesity has been linked to neurologic problems such as migraine, dementia, and sleep apnea. Our experts review the evidence and offer advice for getting weight...

Colino, Stacey

Neurology Now. 12(1):36-45, February/March 2016.

Obesity has been linked to neurologic disorders such as migraine, dementia, and sleep apnea. Our experts review the evidence and offer advice for getting weight under control.

Drink to your Health: A daily glass of wine or bottle of beer may protect against stroke, Parkinson's disease, and cognitive decline, research suggests.

Stephens, Stephanie

Neurology Now. 12(1):19, February/March 2016.

Neurology News: A daily glass of red wine may promote brain health.

Pressure Drop: New evidence suggests low blood pressure may hasten mental decline in elderly people at risk for dementia.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 12(1):9-17, February/March 2016.

Neurology News: Is low blood pressure always a benefit? Not for the elderly at risk of dementia.

Dementia 101: Not all dementia is Alzheimer's disease. Knowing the difference affects planning, management, and prognosis. Our primer breaks down the four most common types, as...

Cohen, Marisa

Neurology Now. 11(6):44-51, December/January 2015.

Not all dementia is Alzheimer's disease. Knowing the difference affects planning, management, and prognosis. Our primer explains the differences.

Holiday Gifts: Grief and loss may dampen celebrations after a neurologic diagnosis, but people who've been there say they experience joy and humor, too. Here's how to remain open...

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(6):38-42, December/January 2015.

Grief and loss may dampen celebrations after a neurologic diagnosis, but there can still be joy and humor. Learn how to remain open to all of it.

Raising Hope: After a neurologic diagnosis, some people get stuck in despair while others find a way to move on. Try these strategies to rebuild your life.

Paturel, Amy

Neurology Now. 11(6):22-27, December/January 2015.

How to move beyond the despair of a devastating neurologic diagnosis.

Help for the Caring: Not all caregivers want an extra hand, even when they really need it. Here's how to accept assistance—and handle the ambivalent emotions that may arise.

Richmond, Christine

Neurology Now. 11(5):54-57, October/November 2015.

Learn how to ask for help and handle any conflicting emotions that arise.

A Labor of Love: Actress Connie Shulman spent a year documenting a friend's dementia to raise awareness of a fatal disease, and discovered new depths of friendship.

Ellin, Abby

Neurology Now. 11(3):34-41, June/July 2015.

Orange Is the New Black's Connie Shulman documented her friend's dementia to raise awareness of a fatal disease, and discovered new depths of friendship.

Anger Management: Many neurologic conditions can cause difficult behavioral changes. Try these strategies for keeping your loved one's aggression or confusion in check.

Paturel, Amy

Neurology Now. 11(3):12-15, June/July 2015.

Many neurologic conditions can cause difficult behavioral changes. Try these strategies for keeping your loved one's aggression or confusion in check.

Readers Like Me: We asked 10 subscribers who have been with Neurology Now for 10 years to share their stories. Here's what they told us.

Hiscott, Rebecca

Neurology Now. 11(2):28-31, April/May 2015.

We asked 10 subscribers who have been with Neurology Now since the beginning to share their stories. Here's what they told us.

A Leader Takes on Brain Disease: Two personal tragedies spur former Vice President Walter F. Mondale's support for aggressive brain research.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(2):18-23, April/May 2015.

Spurred by personal loss, former Vice President Walter F. Mondale is aggressively supporting brain research.

Quick Tips: 3 Questions for Top Sleep DocsWith Sleep Awareness Week around the corner, we asked sleep experts to answer the questions that keep our readers awake at night.

Hiscott, Rebecca

Neurology Now. 11(1):15, February/March 2015.

Quick Tips: Physicians answer questions about the health risks associated with poor sleep.

This Way In: Caucusing for CuresA legislator's personal history fuels his commitment to raising funds for medical innovation.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 11(1):12-13, February/March 2015.

This Way In: Why one legislator is on a mission to raise funds for medical innovation.

Neurology Then and Now: How our understanding of five common neurologic conditions has changed in 30 years.

Gordon, Debra

Neurology Now. 10(6):32-35, December/January 2014.

How our understanding of five common neurologic conditions—Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease—has changed over the last 30 years.

Staying Sharp: What you do during your free time could help save your brain.

Pastural, Amy

Neurology Now. 10(5):40-47, October/November 2014.

An active mind and body could help save your brain. What the research shows about how you can do that in healthy ways.

The Keys to Safety: How neurologic conditions affect driving.

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 10(5):14-16, October/November 2014.

Having a neurologic disorder doesn't necessarily mean giving up the car keys. We speak to experts about how common neurologic conditions impact driving, and what you can do to stay safe.

Still on the Line

Gora, Susannah

Neurology Now. 9(6):16-19, December/January 2013.

Country music star Glen Campbell is one of 5 million Americans with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In 2012 Campbell travelled across the world with his family for “The Goodbye Tour.” In a candid interview, his wife, Kim, says: “The diagnosis of AD makes you realize that you need to cherish each moment with your loved one while he's still present. That's what that tour was for us—cherishing Glen as a father, a husband, and a musical mentor.”

Picture the Brain: New brain-imaging techniques provide better ways to diagnose and treat neurologic conditions.

Valeo, Tom

Neurology Now. 9(5):28-30, October/November 2013.

Until the last couple of decades, neurologists could only observe the consequences of Alzheimer's disease (AD)—and then examine the brain at autopsy. Today, a variety of brain-imaging techniques are providing neurologists with vivid pictures of the brain at work. In turn, these images are opening up new ways to diagnose and treat AD and many other neurologic conditions.

This Way In: Scientists Set Dementia Research Goals

Eastman, Peggy

Neurology Now. 9(5):12-13, October/November 2013.

This Way In: Highlights from the recent National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conference on Alzheimer's-related dementias.

Five Questions to Ask Your Neurologist

Avitzur, Orly

Neurology Now. 9(3):20-26, June-July 2013.

What does my diagnosis mean over the long term? Should I get a second opinion? Orly Avitzur, M.D., Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, explains these and other important questions.

The Brain Needs Blood: Vascular cognitive impairment, one of the most common forms of dementia, may be preventable.

Paturel, Amy

Neurology Now. 9(1):27-30, February-March 2013.

Often mistaken for Alzheimer's disease, vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is one of the most common forms of cognitive impairment and dementia. The good news? VCI may be preventable. Learn how VCI is diagnosed and treated, what research is in the works, and how VCI might be prevented.

Searching for the Early Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

Valeo, Tom

Neurology Now. 8(5):34-35, October-november 2012.

The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative could be a landmark study—if enough people volunteer.

One Precious Gift: Families donate brains to answer their own questions—and those of science.

Talan, Jamie

Neurology Now. 8(5):24-27, October-november 2012.

Music professor and composer George Edwards was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia—until an autopsy revealed he had Alzheimer's disease. His family chose to donate his brain to science to help scientists better understand dementia. Here, other caregivers share their journeys with brain donation, and neurologists discuss why this gift is so priceless.

Speaking of Alzheimer's: CBS Broadcaster Jim Nantz's famous voice has never been clearer.

Farley, Todd

Neurology Now. 8(1):14-19, February-march 2012.

For over 25 years, Jim Nantz has been the voice of CBS Sports. After his dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in the 1990s, Nantz found something else to be vocal about. He wrote a best-selling book in memory of his late father in 2008 and then opened the Nantz National Alzheimer Center.

Neurology News: Neurologists asked to probe for violence

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 8(1):10, February-march 2012.

Neurology News: A position statement from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) on signs of abuse in patients, a new guideline on the interaction of HIV drugs and anti-epilepsy drugs, and information on the AAN's upcoming Brain Health Fair.

Dementia in the Workplace: How long should someone with dementia keep working?

Shaw, Gina

Neurology Now. 7(6):30-33, December-January 2011.

After being diagnosed with dementia, how long should a person wait to stop working? Recent headlines—like the announcement by Pat Summitt that she would continue to coach the University of Tennessee women's basketball team—have thrust this question into the national spotlight.

A Pocket Guide for the Alzheimer's Caregiver

Neurology Now. 7(5):76, October-November 2011.

Where to go for more information on the topics discussed in this issue of Neurology Now and for a directory of patient advocacy organizations.

Get Well, Spend Less: How to save money on treatment costs through patient assistance programs.

Samson, Kurt

Neurology Now. 7(5):59-63, October-November 2011.

Along with the emotional and physical costs of being diagnosed with a neurologic disorder come the tangible costs of treatment. Read here to discover the many organizations, foundations, pharmaceutical companies, and social media sites that can help you save money while receiving top-notch health care.

Some Kind of Wonderful, Indeed: For actress Lea Thompson, Alzheimer's disease advocate is the role of a lifetime

Gora, Susannah

Neurology Now. 7(2):14-19, April-May 2011.

Actress Lea Thompson, of Back to the Future fame, has been playing a lesser-known role for many years: Alzheimer's disease advocate. Along with her family, she performs at fundraisers, talks to lobbyists, and raises awareness of the disease to anyone who will listen.

Come Together: Actors Jill Eikenberry and Michael Tucker on how Alzheimer's disease has made their family bond stronger.

Childers, Linda

Neurology Now. 6(6):16-19,23, November-December 2010.

Jill Eikenberry and Michael Tucker are one of Hollywood's most enduring couples. Known for their roles on L.A. Law, the two actors have been married for 36 years. Several years ago, they found themselves taking on a new role as caregivers to Eikenberry's mother, Lora, who has Alzheimer's disease. Here, they reflect on how the challenge has made their family bond stronger.

When the Nose Doesn't Know

SHAW, GINA

Neurology Now. 6(5):22-23,27-29, September-October 2010.

When the Nose Doesn't Know: Once smell and taste are lost, their importance in everyday life—from detecting spoiled food, to warning of a fire, to enjoying a meal—becomes obvious. Here, a neurologist who shares his patients' loss of smell and taste offers advice on how best to cope with this underappreciated problem.

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