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Neurology Now:
DEPARTMENTS: Message from the Editor

Summer Brings Baseball, Vacations and Medical News!

Brey, Robin L. M.D.

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Professor of Neurology Editor-in-Chief, Neurology Now

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Abstract

What are the things you associate with summertime? I think about fireworks, breaks from school, swim team practice, ice cream and, of course, the ail-American summer sport – baseball.

We all want to see more effective treatments – and ultimately cures – for neurological diseases. Some of the most important research is going on in clinics and volunteers are needed!

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In this issue of Neurology Now, we bring you the story of one of baseball's all-time greats, Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, and his wife, Shonda. They share moretheir deep commitment to fighting amyotrophic lateral sclerosis tments –(ALS) – nicknamed for another for another baseball hero, Lou Gehrig. Read cal on for an inspiring interview with ne of the Richard Olney M.D., a world famous neurologist and ALS researcher, who now battles this disease. Despite his illness, he is still fighting ALS by speaking out about the disease and participating in a clinical trial of a new drug treatment for ALS – as a research volunteer.

Many people don't realize the importance of research volunteers. They are so important that we've included a new feature in Neurology Now called Clinical Trial Watch. Medical research is our hope for new therapies, and ultimately cures, for neurological disease. Much of the most important research is going on in the clinics – and the real heroes are the men, women and children who volunteer for these clinical studies. In Clinical Trial Watch, we bring you their stories and the motivation that drives them.

Don't forget, summer is the time for vacation! It's important to take a break from the usual routine, to relax and recharge your batteries. But, for people with neurological disorders, travel may seem daunting. In Living Well, we provide tips on how to make trips to even faraway destinations feasible and fun. You will also want to check out Resource Central for lots of summertime activities, books to read and news of our upcoming “Think Neurology Now” Expo in Atlanta. That event takes place Oct. 22, 2005! Mark your calendar now and visit www.thinkneurologynow.com for more information.

In addition to these stories, this issue is filled with information on the latest inroads on stroke rehabilitation and new therapies in development to treat – and possibly prevent – Parkinson's disease. We also tackle the issue of how to ensure that your wishes are carried out when you are unable to make health care decisions for yourself and how to get the most out of your doctor's visits.

Please write in and let us know your thoughts. We need your input to make sure Neurology Now continues to deliver the information you need.

Thank you for being a part of the Neurology Now readership family. Nearly 10,000 readers have already signed up to have each issue sent directly to their home, free of charge. You can too! Just send in the subscription card in this issue or call (800) 422-2681 – and you won't ever miss an issue.

Have a safe, wonderful summer!

Sincerely,

Robin L. Brey, M.D.

Professor of Neurology Editor-in-Chief, Neurology Now

We welcome your “Letters to the Editor,” question for “Ask the Experts,” and essays for “Speak Up.” E-mail them to neroologynow@lwwny.com or fax them to(203) 702-5233.

©2005 American Academy of Neurology

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