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Menopause:
doi: 10.1097/GME.0b013e31828ced7f
Original Study

Menopause education: needs assessment of American obstetrics and gynecology residents

Christianson, Mindy S. MD1; Ducie, Jennifer A. MD2; Altman, Kristiina MD, PhD3; Khafagy, Ayatallah M. MB, BCh, MPH4; Shen, Wen MD, MPH2

Editorial
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Abstract

Objective

This study aims to understand the current teaching of menopause medicine in American obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

Methods

A Web-based survey was e-mailed to all American obstetrics and gynecology residency directors, with a request that they forward it to their residents.

Results

Of 258 residency program directors contacted, 79 (30.6%) confirmed forwarding the survey. In all, 1,799 people received the survey, with 510 completions, for a response rate of 28.3%. Most residents reported that they had limited knowledge and needed to learn more about these aspects of menopause medicine: pathophysiology of menopause symptoms (67.1%), hormone therapy (68.1%), nonhormone therapy (79.0%), bone health (66.1%), cardiovascular disease (71.7%), and metabolic syndrome (69.5%). Among fourth-year residents who will be entering clinical practice soon, a large proportion also reported a need to learn more in these areas: pathophysiology of menopause symptoms (45.9%), hormone therapy (54.2%), nonhormone therapy (69.4%), bone health (54.2%), cardiovascular disease (64.3%), and metabolic syndrome (63.8%). When asked to rate the most preferred modalities for learning about menopause, the top choice was supervised clinics (53.2%), followed by case presentations (22.2%), formal lectures (21.3%), small groups (14.7%), Web-based learning (7.8%), and independent reading (5.2%). Only 20.8% of residents reported that their program had a formal menopause medicine learning curriculum, and 16.3% had a defined menopause clinic as part of their residency.

Conclusions

It seems that some American residency programs do not fulfill the educational goals of their residents in menopause medicine. A curriculum would be beneficial for increasing knowledge and clinical experience on menopause issues.

© 2013 by The North American Menopause Society

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