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Menopause:
doi: 10.1097/GME.0b013e31827c5c45
Original Articles

Disruptions in ovarian function are related to depression and cardiometabolic risk during premenopause

Bleil, Maria E. PhD1; Bromberger, Joyce T. PhD2; Latham, Melissa D. BA1; Adler, Nancy E. PhD1; Pasch, Lauri A. PhD1; Gregorich, Steven E. PhD3; Rosen, Mitchell P. MD4; Cedars, Marcelle I. MD4

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Abstract

Objective

The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which mild disruptions in ovarian function, indexed by changes in menstrual cycle length, may relate to cardiometabolic and psychological health in premenopausal women.

Methods

Among 804 healthy, regularly cycling women (aged 25-45 y; mean [SD] age, 35.5 [5.5] y), patterns of any change (shortening, lengthening, or increased variability) versus no change in menstrual cycle length were examined in relation to a composite of cardiometabolic risk and individual risk factors (high-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, waist circumference, glucose, and hypertensive status), as well as in relation to depression indicators (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score ≥16 [yes/no], lifetime depression diagnosis [yes/no], and lifetime antidepressant medication use [yes/no]). Models were also explored to test whether changes in menstrual cycle length mediated relations between depression history and cardiometabolic risk.

Results

In covariate-adjusted models compared with no change, any change in menstrual cycle length was associated with higher cardiometabolic risk composite scores and lower high-density lipoprotein (P < 0.05). In addition, compared with no change, any change in menstrual cycle length was associated with a Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score of 16 or higher, having received a depression diagnosis, and having used antidepressant medications (P < 0.05). In exploratory analyses, any change in menstrual cycle length partially mediated the relation between depression history and cardiometabolic risk (b = 0.152, P = 0.040), which attenuated (b = 0.129, P = 0.083) when any change in menstrual cycle length was covaried.

Conclusions

Findings suggest that disruptions in ovarian function, marked by subtle changes in menstrual cycle length, may relate to aspects of cardiometabolic and psychological health among healthy, premenopausal women.

© 2013 by The North American Menopause Society

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