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Osteoporosis, fragility fracture, and periodontal disease: a cross-sectional study in Spanish postmenopausal women

Martínez-Maestre, Maria Angeles MD, PhD1; Machuca, Guillermo PhD2; González-Cejudo, Carmen MD1; Flores, José Ramón Corcuera PhD2; Cardoso, Rafael Torrejón MD1; Castelo-Branco, Camil MD, PhD3

doi: 10.1097/gme.0b013e31825d24cf
Original Articles

Objective Osteoporosis and periodontitis are common disorders that affect aging populations. It has been hypothesized that both conditions may be related. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between osteoporosis and periodontitis using vertebral fragility fracture as a real marker of osteoporosis and periodontal clinical examination to define periodontitis.

Methods Six hundred thirty-four women aged 55 to 70 years, with fragility spine fractures, and living in the same healthcare region of Seville, Spain, were invited to take part in this cross-sectional study conducted from 2008 to 2010. All the women included in the study were referred to undergo spine radiological examination, spinal densitometry, and full-mouth periodontal assessment.

Results With the exception of number of teeth (19 in the fractured postmenopausal group and 23 in the control group; P < 0.007) and sites with a clinical attachment level lower than 7 mm (P < 0.048), there were no significant differences in clinical and periodontal parameters among women in the fractured postmenopausal group and the control group. In short, fractured postmenopausal women have lost more teeth with more advanced attachment loss (clinical attachment level >7 mm). None of the definitions of periodontitis used resulted in significant differences between groups.

Conclusions The relationship between periodontitis and osteoporosis remains unclear, and further studies considering fragility fracture as a real marker of osteoporosis are warranted to clarify the exact role and effect of one condition on the other and the corresponding clinical implications.

The relationship between periodontitis and osteoporosis remains unclear and further studies considering fragility fracture as a real marker of osteoporosis are warranted to clarify the exact role and effect of one condition on the other and the corresponding clinical implications.

From the 1Gynecology Division, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocío, Seville, Spain; 2Faculty of Odontology, University of Seville, Seville, Spain; and 3Clinic Institute of Gynecology, Obstetrics, and Neonatology, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Institut d’Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain.

Received February 7, 2012; revised and accepted May 1, 2012.

Funding/support: None.

Financial disclosure/conflicts of interest: None reported.

The authors alone are responsible for the content and writing of this article.

Address correspondence to: Maria Angeles Martínez-Maestre, MD, PhD, Servicio de Ginecología, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocí;o, C/Manuel Siurot S/N, Seville, Spain. E-mail: mariaa.martinez.maestre.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es (Spain); Camil Castelo-Branco, MD, PhD, Institut Clínic de Ginecologia, Obstetrícia i Neonatología, Hospital Clínic, Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. E-mail: castelobranco@ub.edu (overseas)

© 2013 by The North American Menopause Society.