November/December 2017 - Volume 42 - Issue 6 - Contributor Index

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Giving Hope to Refugee Families: Carry the Future

Callister, Lynn Clark

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 42(6):363, November/December 2017.

Carry the Future is a grassroots movement to help refuges families which operates without major overhead or marketing costs so it is effective and efficient. Our global health expert, Dr. Lynn Callister, tells us how the organization helps mothers and babies and what you can do to get involved.

The Maternal Infant Microbiome: Considerations for Labor and Birth

Dunn, Alexis B.; Jordan, Sheila; Baker, Brenda J.; More

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 42(6):318-325, November/December 2017.

Multiple aspects of the labor and birth environment have been shown to influence the initial colonization process of the newborn microbiome. Implications of various nursing activities and factors unique to the labor and birth environment that may influence the microbiome of women and newborns during labor and birth are presented.

Open Adoption Placement by Birth Mothers in Their Twenties

Clutter, Lynn B.

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 42(6):345-351, November/December 2017.

Open adoption can have benefits for all members of the adoption triad, the birth mother, the adoptive family, and the adoptee. This study offers further evidence of these benefits by exploring the experiences of 15 birth mothers who participated in open adoption in their twenties.

Status of High Body Weight Among Nurse-Family Partnership Children

Thorland, William; Currie, Dustin; Colangelo, Claire

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 42(6):352-357, November/December 2017.

Obesity rates and their potential associations were evaluated in cohort of over 14,000 children of mothers enrolled in the Nurse-Family Partnership, a program that includes nurse home visits. Results suggest moderation of weight gain during pregnancy, extending breastfeeding duration, and normalization of maternal body mass index before subsequent pregnancies may potentially be effective in lowering the prevalence of high body weight levels in young children of low income families.

The Maternal Gut Microbiome During Pregnancy

Edwards, Sara M.; Cunningham, Solveig A.; Dunlop, Anne L.; More

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 42(6):310-317, November/December 2017.

The prenatal period is marked by unique inflammatory and immune changes that alter maternal gut function and bacterial composition as pregnancy advances. Normal hormonal, metabolic and immunologic changes to the maternal gut microbiome throughout the prenatal period are reviewed, including relevant implications for nurses providing care for pregnant women.

The Maternal Gut Microbiome During Pregnancy

Edwards, Sara M.; Cunningham, Solveig A.; Dunlop, Anne L.; More

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 42(6):310-317, November/December 2017.

The prenatal period is marked by unique inflammatory and immune changes that alter maternal gut function and bacterial composition as pregnancy advances. Normal hormonal, metabolic and immunologic changes to the maternal gut microbiome throughout the prenatal period are reviewed, including relevant implications for nurses providing care for pregnant women.

Status of High Body Weight Among Nurse-Family Partnership Children

Thorland, William; Currie, Dustin; Colangelo, Claire

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 42(6):352-357, November/December 2017.

Obesity rates and their potential associations were evaluated in cohort of over 14,000 children of mothers enrolled in the Nurse-Family Partnership, a program that includes nurse home visits. Results suggest moderation of weight gain during pregnancy, extending breastfeeding duration, and normalization of maternal body mass index before subsequent pregnancies may potentially be effective in lowering the prevalence of high body weight levels in young children of low income families.