July/August 2008 - Volume 33 - Issue 4
pp: 201-264


Is It Professionally Acceptable for a Nurse To Stay Home During a Pandemic?

Chamings, Patricia A.

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 33(4):202, July/August 2008.

What are nurses' obligations during a disaster? Must they attend to their patients, or are their obligations at home a priority? A difficult ethical debate.


Considerations for Emergencies & Disasters IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

Schultz, Ronni; Pouletsos, Cheryl; Combs, Adriann

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 33(4):204-210, July/August 2008.

What are the national recommendations for how to deal with a disaster or other severe emergency in the NICU? These authors have examined the literature to explain it for you.

Evacuation of a Maternal‐Newborn Area During Hurricane Katrina

Bernard, Marirose; Mathews, Pamela R.

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 33(4):213-223, July/August 2008.

These nurses lived through it. Read about their heroic efforts for mothers and children during one of the worst disasters ever in the United States. Would you be prepared?

Implications of Chemical Biological Terrorist Events for Children and Pregnant Women

Teran-MacIver, Maria; Larson, Kristina

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 33(4):224-232, July/August 2008.

We live in a world where all of us in healthcare need to know what to do for our patients and ourselves if a nerve gas or other chemical is released into the population. Do you know what to do?

Addressing Concerns of Pregnant and Lactating Women After the 2005 Hurricanes: The OTIS Response

Quinn, Dorothy; Lavigne, Sharon Voyer; Chambers, Christina; More

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 33(4):235-241, July/August 2008.

Read this article to learn how a telephone counseling program can help families with questions about pregnancy and lactation during an emergency.

Perinatal Nursing in Uncertain Times: The Katrina Effect

Giarratano, Gloria; Orlando, Susan; Savage, Jane

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 33(4):249-257, July/August 2008.

You've read about the theory of disaster preparation, and the real world events, and now this stunning study of what MCH nurses actually experienced working through the hurricane is research no nurse should miss.







Among the Most Vulnerable: Women and Children in Global Disasters

Callister, Lynn Clark

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 33(4):263, July/August 2008.

Disasters can make the lives of women and children even more difficult around the world. Conversely, some important new initiatives have been started because of world attention to the needs of mothers and infants.


Uncommon Preparation Is Needed for Common Emergencies in L&D

James, Dotti C.

MCN, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. 33(4):264, July/August 2008.

It's not only hurricanes and floods. Other emergencies can totally disrupt care in L&D. Are you prepared to cope effectively?

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