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Video Abstract: Acceptability of Group Visits for ADHD in Pediatric Clinics

Video Author: C. Thomas Lewis, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing
Published on: 08.16.2017
Associated with: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. 38(8):565-572, October 2017

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly encountered in primary care practice. Group visits are an alternate way to provide chronic care management while attending to the needs of families. This study examines the acceptability of group visits for ADHD care from the perspectives of caregivers, children and providers and lessons learned in using the group visits across two studies. A brief description of our ADHD group visit model, TEACH-Tailoring Education for ADHD and Children’s Health, is reviewed. Findings suggest that stakeholders find group visits acceptable and increased in satisfaction in ADHD care. Click here to read the article.

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