Video Abstract for "The Brief Early Childhood Screening Assessment: Preliminary Validity in Pediatric Primary Care"

Video Author: Elise Fallucco, MD
Created on: 01.18.2017

This video is a brief summary of the study, "The Brief Early Childhood Screening Assessment: Preliminary Validity in Pediatric Primary Care". It describes the importance of early identification of behavioral and emotional problems in young children, and highlights the development and validation of the Brief ECSA which is a screening instrument used to identify these problems.

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Creator: Elise Fallucco, MD
Duration: 4:35
This video is a brief summary of the study, "The Brief Early Childhood Screening Assessment: Preliminary Validity in Pediatric Primary Care". It describes the importance of early identification of behavioral and emotional problems in young children, and highlights the development and validation of the Brief ECSA which is a screening instrument used to identify these problems.
Creator: Alison Ventura and Brandon Rubenstein
Duration: 3:13
Dr. Alison Ventura discusses her study of patterns of infant bottle-feeding during the first year of life and the association of these patterns with infant weight gain. This research used an innovative methodology – group based trajectory mixture modeling – to address the limitations of previous research aimed at understanding links between infant feeding and health outcomes. This data-driven approach allowed for a better visualization of the balance between breast- and bottle-feeding that occurs for different subsets of infants, as well as how this balance changes across infancy. It also provided novel insights into associations between infant bottle-feeding and weight gain patterns.
Creator: Dr. Marisa Toomey
Duration: 3:54
The peer interactions of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are of particular interest to many physicians and researchers who work with children who have ASD. The PROMIS Pediatric Parent-Proxy Peer Relationships Measure was validated in a general pediatric population, but it had not been previously studied in children with ASD. Clinicians from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Boston Children's Hospital, and The Children's Hospital at Montefiore collaborated to evaluate the existing PROMIS Peer Relationships Measure in a population of children with ASD. In this video, Dr. Marisa Toomey highlights the potential significance of the study.
Creator: University of Michigan Health System
Duration: 5:08
Dr. Jenny Radesky discusses her qualitative interviews with parents of young children about their mobile device use habits, highlighting the 3 main tensions parents expressed. These included: 1) cognitive tensions, feeling “information overload” and difficulties multitasking between tech and children; 2) emotional tensions, including the feeling that the sometimes “intrusive” nature of mobile media makes it more stress-inducing, but also that they seek it as a way self-regulate when stressed with parenting; 3) dyadic tensions, described as discomfort with how mobile device use during family routines seemed to interrupt moments of connection, but also could act as a peacekeeper.
Creator: Piyush Borse, TRIP Lab
Duration: 3:18
Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are one of the leading causes of injury and death for adolescents. Driving is a complex activity that is highly reliant on executive function to safely navigate the environment. This study was among the first to utilize the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) as a potential predictor of problematic adolescent driving outcomes. Self-reported difficulties with planning and organization were associated with greater odds of having a MVC whereas inhibition difficulties were associated with greater odds of receiving a ticket. The BRIEF could offer unique and quick insight into problematic driving behavior during clinical evaluations.
Creator: Nanette Gartrell, MD and Dee Mosbacher MD PhD
Duration: 4:01
Using the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health dataset, we compared spouse/partner relationships and parent-child relationships (family relationships), parenting stress, and children’s general health, emotional difficulties, coping behavior, and learning behavior (child outcomes) in households of same-sex (female) versus different-sex continuously coupled parents with biological offspring. We assessed whether associations among family relationships, parenting stress, and child outcomes were different in the two household types. We found that children with female same-sex parents and different-sex parents demonstrated no differences in outcomes, despite female same-sex parents reporting more parenting stress.
Creator: Deborah Christensen, PhD
Duration: 5:58
Population-based autism spectrum disorder (ASD) surveillance among 4-year old children provides valuable information about the early identification of children with ASD and suggests progression toward lowering the age of first ASD evaluation within participating Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring communities.
Creator: Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, Ph.D
Duration: 1:09
Associate Editor Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, Ph.D offers commentary on the subject of tanning and the link to unhealthy weight control behaviors.



Creator: University of Michigan Health System
Duration: 5:08
Dr. Jenny Radesky discusses her qualitative interviews with parents of young children about their mobile device use habits, highlighting the 3 main tensions parents expressed. These included: 1) cognitive tensions, feeling “information overload” and difficulties multitasking between tech and children; 2) emotional tensions, including the feeling that the sometimes “intrusive” nature of mobile media makes it more stress-inducing, but also that they seek it as a way self-regulate when stressed with parenting; 3) dyadic tensions, described as discomfort with how mobile device use during family routines seemed to interrupt moments of connection, but also could act as a peacekeeper.
Creator: Elise Fallucco, MD
Duration: 4:35
This video is a brief summary of the study, "The Brief Early Childhood Screening Assessment: Preliminary Validity in Pediatric Primary Care". It describes the importance of early identification of behavioral and emotional problems in young children, and highlights the development and validation of the Brief ECSA which is a screening instrument used to identify these problems.
Creator: Alison Ventura and Brandon Rubenstein
Duration: 3:13
Dr. Alison Ventura discusses her study of patterns of infant bottle-feeding during the first year of life and the association of these patterns with infant weight gain. This research used an innovative methodology – group based trajectory mixture modeling – to address the limitations of previous research aimed at understanding links between infant feeding and health outcomes. This data-driven approach allowed for a better visualization of the balance between breast- and bottle-feeding that occurs for different subsets of infants, as well as how this balance changes across infancy. It also provided novel insights into associations between infant bottle-feeding and weight gain patterns.
Creator: Dr. Marisa Toomey
Duration: 3:54
The peer interactions of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are of particular interest to many physicians and researchers who work with children who have ASD. The PROMIS Pediatric Parent-Proxy Peer Relationships Measure was validated in a general pediatric population, but it had not been previously studied in children with ASD. Clinicians from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Boston Children's Hospital, and The Children's Hospital at Montefiore collaborated to evaluate the existing PROMIS Peer Relationships Measure in a population of children with ASD. In this video, Dr. Marisa Toomey highlights the potential significance of the study.
Creator: Piyush Borse, TRIP Lab
Duration: 3:18
Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are one of the leading causes of injury and death for adolescents. Driving is a complex activity that is highly reliant on executive function to safely navigate the environment. This study was among the first to utilize the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) as a potential predictor of problematic adolescent driving outcomes. Self-reported difficulties with planning and organization were associated with greater odds of having a MVC whereas inhibition difficulties were associated with greater odds of receiving a ticket. The BRIEF could offer unique and quick insight into problematic driving behavior during clinical evaluations.
Creator: Nanette Gartrell, MD and Dee Mosbacher MD PhD
Duration: 4:01
Using the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health dataset, we compared spouse/partner relationships and parent-child relationships (family relationships), parenting stress, and children’s general health, emotional difficulties, coping behavior, and learning behavior (child outcomes) in households of same-sex (female) versus different-sex continuously coupled parents with biological offspring. We assessed whether associations among family relationships, parenting stress, and child outcomes were different in the two household types. We found that children with female same-sex parents and different-sex parents demonstrated no differences in outcomes, despite female same-sex parents reporting more parenting stress.