Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Longitudinal Analysis of Emotional Problems in Children with Congenital Heart Defects: A Follow-Up from Age 6 to 36 Months

Stene-Larsen, Kim PhD*†; Brandlistuen, Ragnhild Eek MS*†; Holmstrøm, Henrik PhD‡; Landolt, Markus A. PhD§; Eskedal, Leif T. PhD∥; Engdahl, Bo PhD*; Vollrath, Margarete E. PhD*†

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics: July/August 2011 - Volume 32 - Issue 6 - pp 461-464
doi: 10.1097/DBP.0b013e3182202d2b
Brief Report

Objective: To investigate whether children with varying severity of congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a higher risk of internalizing or externalizing emotional problems at 36 months of age. In addition, to analyze whether a history of emotional problems at 6 or 18 months of age increases the risk of emotional problems at 36 months in children with CHDs.

Methods: Prospective data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, was linked with a nationwide CHD registry, and 175 children with CHDs were identified in a cohort of 44,104 children aged 36 months. Maternal reports on child characteristics were assessed by questionnaires at child age 6, 18, and 36 months.

Results: Children with CHDs did not have elevated scores on internalizing or externalizing problems at 36 months of age compared with controls. Not even the children with CHDs with a history of emotional problems at age 6 or 18 months showed an increased risk.

Conclusions: The absence of risk of emotional problems at 36 months of age in children with CHDs could be a consequence of the completion of the most extensive medical treatment.

From the *Division of Mental Health, Department of Psychosomatics and Health Behavior, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; †Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; ‡Department of Pediatrics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; §Department of Psychosomatics and Psychiatry, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; ∥Department of Pediatrics, Sørlandet Hospital HF, Kristiandsand, Norway.

Received November 2010; accepted April 2011.

The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study is supported by the Norwegian Ministry of Health, NIH/NIEHS (grant N01-ES-85433), NIH/NINDS (grant 1 UO1 NS 047537-01), and the Norwegian Research Council/FUGE (grant 151918/S10). This study is supported by the Norwegian Research Council (grant 181862/V50).

Address for reprints: Kim Stene-Larsen, PhD, Division of Mental Health, Department of Psychosomatics and Health Behavior, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Postbox 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway; e-mail: kim.stene-larsen@fhi.no.

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.