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Caregiver-Reported Health Outcomes of Preschool Children Born at 28 to 32 Weeks' Gestation

Schiariti, Veronica MD*; Houbè, Jill S. MD, M.Phil., FAAP, FRCPC*,†; Lisonkova, Sarka MD†; Klassen, Anne F. D.Phil.‡; Lee, Shoo K. PhD, MBBS, FAAP, FRCPC†

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics:
doi: 10.1097/01.DBP.0000257516.52459.33
Original Article
Abstract

Objective: We conducted a population-based survey of caregivers of all preschoolers at 42 months of age who had been admitted at birth in 1996–1997 to a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit in British Columbia (BC), Canada.

Methods: In this paper, we examine health status (measured by Health Status Classification System [HSCS-PS]), health-related quality of life (HRQL) (measured by Infant and Toddler Quality of Life Questionnaire), and behavioral outcomes (measured by Child Behavior Checklist) of the preschoolers in the sample who were born at 28–32 weeks gestational age (GA) in comparison to those born at <28 weeks GA. In addition, we compare these outcomes to health status, HRQL, and behavioral outcomes of a cohort of healthy full-term infants identified from the primary care practices at two of the hospital sites in BC in 1996–1997.

Results: From the total identified sample of 555 children, the survey was completed for 50 children born at <28 weeks GA, 201 children born at 28–32 weeks GA, and 393 healthy full-term subjects. The developmental outcomes of the preschoolers born at 28–32 weeks GA was very similar to those born at <28 weeks GA. We also found increased parental report of problems related to health status and HRQL among the 28–32 weeks GA group. When compared with the term cohort, the 28–32 weeks GA group had poorer outcomes in all HRQL domains.

Conclusion: This study discusses the importance of continued neurodevelopmental follow-up care of infants born at 28–32 weeks GA in addition to those infants born <28 weeks GA.

Author Information

From the *British Columbia Children's Hospital; †Centre for Health Innovation and Improvement; and ‡Centre for Community Child Health Research, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Received November 2005; accepted June 2006.

Disclosure: Veronica Schiariti was the recipient of a trainee award from The Neonatal-Perinatal Interdisciplinary Capacity Enhancement (NICE) Team, which was funded by CIHR, and holds a Graduate Studentship from the British Columbia Research Institute. Anne Klassen holds a New Investigator Award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Author disclosure: The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation (Toronto) provided an operating grant for this study. Veronica Schiariti was the recipient of a trainee award from The Neonatal-Perinatal Interdisciplinary Capacity Enhancement (NICE) Team, which was funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). From British Columbia Research Institute, Veronica Schiariti holds a Graduate Studentship. Anne Klassen holds a New Investigator Award from CIHR and a Scholar Award from Michael Smith Foundation for Research.

Address for reprints: Veronica Schiariti, M.D., Sunny Hill Health Centre, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Room S112C, 3644 Slocan Street, Vancouver, BC V5M 3E8, Canada; e-mail: vschiariti@cw.bc.ca.

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.