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The Physician Belief Scale and Psychosocial Problems in Children: A Report from the Pediatric Research in Office Settings and the Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network.

McLENNAN, JOHN D. M.D., M.P.H.; JANSEN-McWILLIAMS, LINDA; DIANE, M. A.; COMER, M. B.A.; GARDNER, WILLIAM P. Ph.D.; KELLEHER, KELLY J. M.D., M.P.H.
Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics:
Original Articles: PDF Only
Abstract

: Clinicians' management of children with psychosocial problems may vary with their attitudes and beliefs. However, we lack sound instruments to assess these factors. This study examined the psychometric properties of the Physician Belief Scale (PBS). A modified version of the PBS was sent to clinicians who participated in two primary care research networks. Using factor analysis, we reduced the PBS to 14 items and 2 subscales. Cronbach's alpha values were high. Female clinicians, those using DSM-IV, and those having completed training earlier rated themselves as more psychosocially oriented. Identification and treatment of psychosocial problems were significantly related to scores on the Belief and Feeling subscale. The PBS provided only a modest amount of information regarding primary care practices. It is not clear if these limitations are attributable to the instrument or the many other barriers to effective psychosocial care.

(C) 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.