Editor-in-Chief: Lloyd F. Novick, MD, MPH
Associate Editor:
Justin B. Moore, PhD, MS
ISSN: 1078-4659
Online ISSN: 1550-5022
Frequency: 6 issues / year
Impact Factor: 1.396
From the Editor

​​​​​As we collectively attempt to outlast the wintery weather that has affected much of the east coast (or flee to warmer destinations, as the case may be), we are happy to announce the March/April Issue of the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. In this issue are a number of compelling articles that should provide intellectually stimulating and informative reading for those of you gathered around the hearth or on the beach. The March/April issue leads off with two editorials deserving of your attention. The first, by Paul Jarris, "Parting Thoughts of a State Health Official," imparts Dr. Jarris' thoughts on the effective execution of the duties of a state health director. This editorial draws upon his considerable expertise in public health leadership. In the second editorial, LaMar Hasbrouck shares his ideas on the successful navigation of emerging challenges in public health, including health care reform and accreditation. The issue has a number of research articles that highlight capacity, challenges, and supports for local health departments to meet the many demands faced in their collective work. For example, Kate Beatty and colleagues identify and discuss the "Barriers and Incentives to Rural Health Department Accreditation," to provide insights relevant to rural health departments across the country. Finally, we would like to draw your attention to our heartfelt expression of gratitude to the recent manuscript reviewers for the JPHMP, without whom we could not produce the journal.​


Lloyd F. Novick, MD, MPH                                                       Justin B. Moore, PhD, MS

Editor-in-Chief                                                                       Associate Editor


 

Four articles on immunization information systems have been published ahead of print (PAP) by the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. Two of these articles report the findings of a recent systematic review by the Community Preventive Services Task Force. A third article, a Practice Brief Report, provides “Recommendations for use of Immunization Information Systems to Increase Vaccination Rates.” A fourth article, from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, by Daniel Martin “Immunization Information Systems: A Decade of Progress in Law and Policy” is a study of laws, regulations and policies governing Immunization Information Systems (IIS), also known as immunization registries. 

Here are the links to each article and the editorial that accompanies them:


Editorial: Immunization Information Systems

Immunization Information Systems to Increase Vaccination Rates: A Community Guide Systematic Review

Economic Review of Immunization Information Systems to Increase Vaccination Rates: A Community Guide Systematic Review

Recommendation for Use of Immunization Information Systems to Increase Vaccination Rates


Immunization Information Systems: A Decade of Progress in Law and Policy

Article Update

National Survey Captures Local Health Department Successes at Community Engagement in Emergency Preparedness

This summer, NACCHO, the de Beaumont Foundation, and the UPMC Center for Health Security are collaborating in the national release of the 2015 “Community Engagement for Public Health Emergency Preparedness” (CEPHEP) survey. The CEPHEP survey provides local health departments (LHDs) an important platform to document their efforts at enabling residents as well as community- and faith-based organizations to strengthen hometown readiness, response, and recovery. Emergency preparedness coordinators (EPCs) should be on the lookout for an email invitation to participate in the survey over the next few weeks. The online survey should take no more than 15 minutes to complete.

By completing the original CEPHEP survey in 2012, EPCs helped to produce the first comprehensive, nationwide picture of how their agencies are adopting participatory and collaborative approaches to emergency preparedness. Moreover, EPCs were able to register which organizational factors (eg, leadership, able staff, willing partners, formal planning) had the most influence on their success. For more details on the 2012 findings, please click here to see a report of the results published in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.

Current Issue Highlights

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Special Supplements

 

November/December 2015
Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey
Support for this supplement provided by the de Beaumont Foundation.

May/June 2015
Evaluation of the Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities National Program
Support for this supplement was provided by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

March/April 2015
Environmental Public Health Tracking
This supplement was sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Public Health Tracking Program.

 

January/February 2015
Big City Health Departments: Leadership Perspectives
This supplement was sponsored by the de Beaumont Foundation in support of the Big Cities Health Coalition.

September/October 2014
Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers: Lessons and Models
Enjoy complimentary access of this supplement produced in cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health.

January/February 2014
Public Health Interventions to
Reduce Sodium Intake

Enjoy complimentary access provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention.

Topical Collections

Journal of Public Health Management & Practice has launched its first collection, Quality Improvement, which contains two great journal issues on the topic. Please visit the new Collections page for this topical collection, and look for more collections in the future.

Upcoming Topics

Look for these topics in 2016:

Health Equity

Local Health Departments

Unintentional Injuries and Violence