Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Increased Life Expectancy in New York City, 2001-2010: An Exploration by Cause of Death and Demographic Characteristics

Li, Wenhui PhD; Maduro, Gil A. PhD; Begier, Elizabeth M. MD, MPH

Journal of Public Health Management & Practice: May/June 2016 - Volume 22 - Issue 3 - p 255–264
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000265
Original Articles

Objective: New York City's (NYC's) life expectancy gains have been greater than those seen nationally. We examined life-expectancy changes over the past decade in selected NYC subpopulations and explored which age groups and causes of death contributed most to the increases.

Methods: We calculated life expectancy with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 2001-2010 by sex and race/ethnicity. Life expectancy was decomposed by age group and cause of death. Logistic regressions were conducted to reinforce the results from decomposition by controlling confounders.

Results: Overall, NYC residents' life expectancy at birth increased from 77.9 years (95% CI, 77.8-78.0) in 2001 to 80.9 years (95% CI, 80.8-81.0) in 2010. Decreases in deaths from heart disease, cancer, and HIV disease accounted for 50%, 16%, and 11%, respectively, of the gains. Decreased mortality in older age groups (≥65 years) accounted for 45.6% of the overall change.

Conclusions: Life expectancy increased for both sexes, across all racial/ethnic groups, and for both the US-born and the foreign-born. Disparities in life expectancy decreased as overall life expectancy increased. Decreased mortality among older adults and from heart disease, cancer, and HIV infection accounted for most of the increases.

This study examines life-expectancy changes over the past decade in selected New York City subpopulations and explores which age groups and causes of death contributed most to the increases.

Bureau of Vital Statistics, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York.

Correspondence: Wenhui Li, PhD, Statistical Analysis and Reporting Unit, Bureau of Vital Statistics, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 125 Worth St, Room 205, CN-7, New York, NY 10013 (wli@health.nyc.gov).

The authors thank the staff of the Bureau of Vital Statistics at NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for collecting and cleaning these vital statistics data; Carolyn Greene, Tiffany Harris, Carolyn Olson, Adam Karpati, Susan Kansagra, Ann Madsen, and James Hadler for helpful comments on the draft of the manuscript; Margaret Millstone for assistance with technical editing; 2 anonymous reviewers for helpful comments; and Ted Joyce for his advice on methods.

The authors did not receive any financial support or other benefits from commercial sources for the work reported in the manuscript, nor do they have any other financial interests, which could create a potential conflict of interest or the appearance of a conflict of interest with regard to the work.

Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.