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Journal of Public Health Management & Practice:
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e31829aa28e
Original Articles

Quantifying the Effect of Changes in State-Level Adult Smoking Rates on Youth Smoking

Farrelly, Matthew C. PhD; Arnold, Kristin Y. MSPH; Juster, Harlan R. PhD; Allen, Jane A. MA

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Abstract

Objective:

Quantify the degree to which changes in state-level adult smoking prevalence subsequently influence youth smoking prevalence.

Design:

Analysis of data from the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey (TUS-CPS) collected from 1995 to 2006 and the National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) collected from 1999 to 2006.

Setting and Participants:

Adults 25 years or older who completed the TUS-CPS and youth in middle and high school who completed the NYTS.

Main Outcome Measures:

Current smoking among middle and high school students as a function of the change in state-level adult smoking, controlling for individual-level sociodemographic characteristics and state-level tobacco control policy variables.

Results:

Among middle school students, declines in state-level adult smoking rates are associated with lower odds of current smoking (P < .05), and each doubling of the decline in adult smoking rates is associated with a 6.0% decrease in youth smoking. Among high school students, declines in state-level adult smoking rates are not associated with current smoking. Higher cigarette prices were associated with lower odds of smoking among middle and high school students. Greater population coverage by smoke-free air laws and greater funding for tobacco control programs were associated with lower odds of current smoking among high school students but not middle school students. Compliance with youth access laws was not associated with middle or high school smoking.

Conclusion:

By quantifying the effect of changes in state-level adult smoking rates on youth smoking, this study enhances the precision with which the tobacco control community can assess the return on investment for adult-focused tobacco control programs.

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

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