Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Improved Newborn Hearing Screening Follow-up Results in More Infants Identified

Alam, Suhana MPH; Gaffney, Marcus MPH; Eichwald, John MA

Journal of Public Health Management & Practice: March/April 2014 - Volume 20 - Issue 2 - p 220–223
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e31829d7b57
Original Articles

Longitudinal research suggests that efforts at the national, state, and local levels are leading to improved follow-up and data reporting. Data now support the assumption that the number of deaf or hard-of-hearing infants identified through newborn hearing screening increases with a reduction in the number of infants lost to follow-up. Documenting the receipt of services has made a noticeable impact on reducing lost to follow-up rates and early identification of infants with hearing loss; however, continued improvement and monitoring of services are still needed.

This study analyzes data to determine the association between the number of infants reported as lost to follow-up (LFU)/documentation in 2005-2011 and the number of infants deaf or hard of hearing identified during the same period. Documenting the receipt of services has made an impact on reducing LFU rates and early identification of infants with hearing loss; however, continued improvement and monitoring of services are still needed.

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Ms Alam); and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia (Messrs Gaffney and Eichwald).

Correspondence: Suhana Alam, MPH, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333 (SAlam1@cdc.gov).

The authors declare that there are no conflicts of interest.

© 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.