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Factors Associated With Receipt of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Monovalent and Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Among School-Aged Children: Maricopa County, Arizona, 2009-2010 Influenza Season

Baty, Steven A. DVM, MPH; Ayala, Aurimar MPH; Odish, Mazen BSE; Cadwell, Betsy L. MSPH; Schumacher, Mare MS; Sunenshine, Rebecca H. MD

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice: September/October 2013 - Volume 19 - Issue 5 - p 436–443
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e3182751d1c
Original Articles

Context: To target school-aged children (SAC), who were identified as a priority for pandemic 2009 Influenza A (pH1N1) vaccination, Maricopa County (MC) initiated school-based influenza vaccination in 69% of its 706 schools during the 2009-2010 influenza season.

Objective: To determine factors associated with receipt of pH1N1 monovalent and 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccination among SAC and evaluate the association of school-based vaccination with vaccination status of SAC.

Design: Random-digit dialing was used to survey 600 MC households with willing adult participants and children grades K-12. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with pH1N1 and seasonal vaccine receipt.

Setting: Arizona.

Participants: Household adults with children grades K-12.

Main Outcome Measure: Characteristics of children, parents, and households were obtained.

Results: Among 909 SAC, 402 (44%) received pH1N1 and 436 (48%) received seasonal vaccination. Factors associated with pH1N1 vaccination included vaccine availability at school (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-2.7), high-risk medical condition in child (AOR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4-4.0), elementary versus high school attendance (AOR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0-2.7), and seasonal influenza vaccination (AOR: 10.0; 95% CI: 6.4-15.6). Factors associated with seasonal vaccination included Hispanic ethnicity (AOR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1-4.2), health insurance coverage (AOR: 4.8; 95% CI: 1.7-13.7), elementary versus high school attendance (AOR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.0-2.5), and pH1N1 vaccination (AOR: 10.5; 95% CI: 6.7-16.6).

Conclusions: Availability of pH1N1 vaccine at school was independently associated with pH1N1 vaccination of MC school-aged children. School-based influenza vaccination campaigns should be considered to increase vaccination among this population.

This study aims at determining factors associated with receipt of pH1N1 monovalent and 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccination among school-aged children and evaluating the association of school-based vaccination with vaccination status of school-aged children.

Arizona Department of Health Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Epidemic Intelligence Service Field Assignments Branch, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Baty); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Epidemic Intelligence Service Field Assignments Branch (Ms Cadwell), Office of Epidemiology, Maricopa County (Ms Ayala), University of Arizona College of Medicine (Mr Odish), Office of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Maricopa County (Ms Schumacher), and Department of Public Health, Maricopa County, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Career Epidemiology Field Officer (Dr Sunenshine) Phoenix, Arizona.

Correspondence: Steven A. Baty, DVM, MPH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 30333 (steven.baty@us.army.mil).

This research study was supported by a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Emergency Response grant.

The findings in this report are based, in part, on the assistance from members of the Maricopa County Department of Public Health Office of Epidemiology, Phoenix, Arizona.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.