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The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART): An Intervention to Build Community Resilience to Disasters

Pfefferbaum, Rose L. PhD, MPH; Pfefferbaum, Betty MD, JD; Van Horn, Richard L. PhD; Klomp, Richard W. MOB, MS, LPC; Norris, Fran H. PhD; Reissman, Dori B. MD

Journal of Public Health Management & Practice:
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e318268aed8
Original Articles
Abstract

Community resilience has emerged as a construct to support and foster healthy individual, family, and community adaptation to mass casualty incidents. The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART) is a publicly available theory-based and evidence-informed community intervention designed to enhance community resilience by bringing stakeholders together to address community issues in a process that includes assessment, feedback, planning, and action. Tools include a field-tested community resilience survey and other assessment and analytical instruments. The CART process encourages public engagement in problem solving and the development and use of local assets to address community needs. CART recognizes 4 interrelated domains that contribute to community resilience: connection and caring, resources, transformative potential, and disaster management. The primary value of CART is its contribution to community participation, communication, self-awareness, cooperation, and critical reflection and its ability to stimulate analysis, collaboration, skill building, resource sharing, and purposeful action.

In Brief

This article reviews the concepts used in constructing the Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit (CART). The CART process engages community representatives to measure their community's resilience and to explore and promote actions to enhance it.

Author Information

Liberal Arts Department, Phoenix Community College, Phoenix, Arizona (Dr Rose Pfefferbaum); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine (Dr Betty Pfefferbaum), and Terrorism and Disaster Center (Drs Rose Pfefferbaum, Betty Pfefferbaum, and Van Horn), University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City; Office of Safety, Health, and Environment, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Georgia (Mr Klomp); Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire, and National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, White River Junction, Vermont (Dr Norris); and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC (Dr Reissman).

Correspondence: Betty Pfefferbaum, MD, JD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, PO Box 26901, WP 3470, Oklahoma City, OK 73126 (Betty-Pfefferbaum@ouhsc.edu).

CART Copyright 2011 Pfefferbaum RL, Pfefferbaum B, Van Horn RL. Terrorism and Disaster Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

This work was funded in part by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services, which established the Terrorism and Disaster Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The Terrorism and Disaster Center is a partner in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Funding for this work was also provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), which is a US Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence at the University of Maryland.

The authors report no conflicts of interest. The findings, conclusions, opinions, and contents of this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dartmouth Medical School, the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the US Department of Health and Human Services, the US Department of Homeland Security, the US Public Health Service, or the University of Maryland.

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.