You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

The Collaborative Experience of Creating the National Capital Region Disease Surveillance Network

Lewis, Sheri H. MPH; Holtry, Rekha S. MPH; Loschen, Wayne A. MS; Wojcik, Richard MS; Hung, Lang MPH; Lombardo, Joseph MS

Journal of Public Health Management & Practice:
doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e3181f9eeda
Original Article
Abstract

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) implemented state and district surveillance nodes in a central aggregated node in the National Capital Region (NCR). Within this network, de-identified health information is integrated with other indicator data and is made available to local and state health departments for enhanced desease surveillance. Aggregated data made available to the central node enable public health practitioners to observe abnormal behavior of health indicators spanning jurisdictions and view geographical spread of outbreaks across regions.

Forming a steering committee, the NCR Enhanced Surveillance Operating Group (ESOG), was key to overcoming several data-sharing issues. The committee was composed of epidemiologists and key public health practitioners from the 3 jurisdictions. The ESOG facilitated early system development and signing of the cross-jurisdictional data-sharing agreement. This agreement was the first of its kind at the time and provided the legal foundation for sharing aggregated health information across state/distric boundaries for electronic disease surveillance.

Electronic surveillance system for the early notification of community-based epidemics provides NCR users with a comprehensive regional view to ascertain the spread of disease, estimate resource needs, and implement control measures. This article aims to describe the creation of the NCR Disease Surveillance Network as an exceptional example of cooperation and potential that exists for regional surveillance activities.

In Brief

This article aims to describe the creation of the NCR Disease Surveillance Network as an exceptional example of cooperation and potential that exists for regional surveillance activities.

Author Information

Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, National Security Technology Department, Laurel, Maryland

Correspondence: Sheri H. Lewis, MPH, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, National Security Technology Department, Laurel, Maryland (sheri.lewis@jhuapl.edu).

This work was made possible through grant number 7UASI137-01 from the Department of Homeland Security's Urban Area Security Initiative.

The authors thank the Office of National Capital Region Coordination within the Department of Homeland Security, the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments' Health Officers Committee, and the NCR Senior Policy Group for their continued support of this program. In addition, the authors thank their colleagues in the state and local health departments for their contribution and the ESSENCE development team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.