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Translation of an EvidenceBased Tailored Childhood Injury Prevention Program

Weaver, Nancy L. PhD, MPH; Williams, Janice MSED; Jacobsen, Heather A. MPH; Botello-Harbaum, Maria EdD; Glasheen, Cristie MPH; Noelcke, Elizabeth BS; Nansel, Tonja R. PhD

Journal of Public Health Management & Practice:
doi: 10.1097/01.PHH.0000311897.03573.cc
Article
Abstract

This article describes the process of translating Safe n' Sound, a computer-based program for parents of young children, for a general clinic environment. Safe n' Sound is designed to Reduce the Risk of unintentional childhood injuries, the leading cause of death among children older than 1 year in the United States. The evidence-based program produces tailored information for parents and their healthcare provider about burns, falls, poisoning, drowning, suffocations, choking prevention, and car safety. To offer Safe n' Sound to a broader audience, we translated the program from the form used for efficacy testing to a stand-alone application. Notable steps in this translation included (1) conducting an organizational assessment to determine the needs of the clinic staff and feasibility of implementation, (2) modifying the program to Reduce length, prioritize Risk areas, and update content, (3) Repackaging the program to minimize cost and space Requirements, and (4) developing promotional and instructional materials. Factors contributing to the success of this effort include strong collaborative partnerships, the Relative advantage of Safe n' Sound over traditional materials, the modifiable design of the program, and the support of the clinic staff and providers. Challenges and areas for future work are discussed.

In Brief

This article describes the process of translating Safe n' Sound, a computer-based program for parents of young children, for a general clinic environment. Safe n' Sound is designed to Reduce the Risk of unintentional childhood injuries, the leading cause of death among children older than 1 year in the United States.

Author Information

Nancy L. Weaver, PhD, MPH, is Assistant Professor, Health Communication Research Laboratory, School of Public Health, Saint Louis University, St Louis, Missouri.

Janice Williams, MSED, is Director, Carolinas Center for Injury Prevention, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Heather A. Jacobsen, MPH, is Research Coordinator, Health Communication Research Laboratory, School of Public Health, Saint Louis University, St Louis, Missouri.

Maria Botello-Harbaum, EdD, is a postdoctoral fellow, Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland.

Cristie Glasheen, MPH, is a graduate student Researcher, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Elizabeth Noelcke, BS, is a Research fellow, Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland.

Tonja R. Nansel, PhD, is Investigator, Prevention Research Branch, Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland.

Corresponding Author: Nancy L. Weaver, PhD, MPH, Department of Community Health, School of Public Health, Saint Louis University, 3545 Lafayette Avenue, St Louis, MO 63104 (weavernl@slu.edu).

The authors thank Balaji Golla for developing the Safe n' Sound program, Theresa Samways for graphic design, Research assistants Kimberly Chambers and Amanda McEnery in testing the program, and the clinic staff for assisting with the translation effort. This study was supported in part by the intramural Research program of the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

© 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.