Skip Navigation LinksHome > August 2003 - Volume 37 - Issue 2 > Functional Outcomes of Pediatric Liver Transplantation
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition:
Original Articles-Liver and Nutrition

Functional Outcomes of Pediatric Liver Transplantation

Alonso, E. M.; Neighbors, K.; Mattson, C.; Sweet, E.; Ruch-Ross, H.; Berry, C.; Sinacore, J.

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Abstract

The functional status and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of children who survive liver transplantation (LT) have not been well documented. The purpose of this study was to determine the functional status and HRQOL in this population using a validated measure for children, the Child Health Questionnaire-Parent Form 50 (CHQ-PF50).

Methods: The CHQ-PF50 instrument was completed by the parents of 55 children who agreed to participate in a mailing survey. Subscale scores for the sample were compared with those of a published normal population (n = 391).

Results: Study sample characteristics were: 87% Caucasian, 54.5% female, mean age at survey was 9.6 years (range, 5–17 years). Responding caregivers were 95% biologic parents and 93% female. Compared with the normal population, LT recipients had lower subscale scores for general health perceptions (P < 0.0005), emotional impact on parents (<0.0005) and disruption of family activities (0.0005). The mean physical summary score of the LT recipients was lower than that of the normal population 48.1 ± 12.1 (P = 0.005), but the mean psychosocial summary score was similar 48.8 ± 11.9 (P = 0.156). Within the LT population, the original diagnosis (biliary atresia vs. other), type of LT (living donor vs. cadaveric), age at LT, z score for height, and hospital days did not significantly influence any of the subscale scores.

Conclusions: Children who have survived LT have functional outcomes in the physical domain that are lower than those of normal children. Self-esteem and mental health in this group appeared normal. The parents in this sample experienced more emotional stress and disruption of family activities than did parents in a normal population.

© 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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