Skip Navigation LinksHome > May 2006 - Volume 42 - Issue 5 > THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF ATOPY PATCH TEST AND SKIN PRICK TEST...
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition:
Notices: 39th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Dresden, Germany, June 7-10, 2006: Abstracts: PG3-19

THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF ATOPY PATCH TEST AND SKIN PRICK TESTIN LATE-PHASE CLINICAL REACTIONS TO FOOD IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

Francavilla, R1; Lorè, M2; Leone, M2; Miniello, V2; Fanelli, M3; De Canio, A2; Armenio, L2; Brunetti, L2

Free Access
Article Outline
Collapse Box

Author Information

1UO Maggiore Dipartimento Biomedicina eta Evolutiva, Bari, Italy;

2CIRGEEE Dipartimento Biomedicina eta Evolutiva, Bari, Italy; and

3Dipartimento di Statistica Università di Bari, Bari, Italy.

Back to Top | Article Outline

Aim:

To compare Atopy Patch Test (APT) and Skin Prick Test (SPT) to double blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs) for late-phase reactions to milk, egg and wheat in children with atopic dermatitis (AD).

Back to Top | Article Outline

Methods:

All the 131 consecutive children [(80 M (61%); median age: 44 mo (range 4 to 151 mo)] with AD and suspected of late-phase food-related clinical symptoms were investigated with SPT, APT and DBPCFCs.

Back to Top | Article Outline

Results:

Overall, we performed 512 DBPCFCs (256 with food: 85 milk, 100 egg, 71 wheat) and 77 (15%; all with food) were positive [33 for cow's milk (38%; 17 late); 40 for egg (40%; 13 late) and 4 for wheat (6%; 3 late). APT resulted positive for milk in 23 children (18,6%), for egg in 42 (33,6%) and for wheat in 7 (5,5%) while SPT were positive for milk in 26 (19,8%), for egg in 68 (51,9%) and for wheat in 6 (4,6%). The SS, SP, PPV and NPV of SPT and APT in assessing a late phase reaction to food are shown in the table.

Table. No caption av...
Image Tools

Logistic regression showed that SPT and APT were significantly associated with a late phase reactions to milk (OR = 3,7; 95%CI: 1-12 and OR = 4,4; 95%CI: 1-14 respectively) and both positive tests quadruplicates the risk of a positive challenge. However, only APT was predictive for late phase reactions to egg (OR = 11; 95%CI: 2-60) and wheat (OR = 5,4; 95%CI: 1-8).

Back to Top | Article Outline

Summary:

Our findings confirm that the APT may be a valuable additional tool in the diagnostic work-up of food allergy in children with AD because of its high specificity and sensibility for late-phase clinical reactions especially for egg and wheat but it can not replace DBPCFC.

Conclusion: APT identify children not at risk for late phase reactions to food however DBPCFC must be still considered the diagnostic gold standard test.

© 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Login

Article Tools

Images

Share

Connect With Us

 

 

Twitter

twitter.com/JPGNonline

 

Visit JPGN.org on your smartphone. Scan this code (QR reader app required) with your phone and be taken directly to the site.