Skip Navigation LinksHome > October 2005 - Volume 41 - Issue 4 > FREQUENCY OF DELTA F508 MUTATION IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS...
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition:
Abstracts: North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Annual Meeting October 20-22, 2005 Salt Lake City, Utah: POSTER SESSION III SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2005 7:45AM - 9:45AM: Pancreas and Cystic Fibrosis

FREQUENCY OF DELTA F508 MUTATION IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ACUTE RECURRENT PANCREATITIS: 185

Sanchez-Ramirez, Carmen A2,1; Larrosa-Haro, Alfredo2,1; Macias-Rosales, Rocio2,1; Villa-Gomez, Alejandra1,2; Martinez-Puente, Elsa1,2

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1Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Hospital de Pediatria, Guadalajara, Mexico; 2Unidad de Investigacion en Epidemiologia Clinica, IMSS, Guadalajara, Mexico

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Introduction:

Mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene in children with recurrent pancreatitis (RP) have been recently described. The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of the mutation DF508 in children and adolescents with acute pancreatitis (AP) vs. recurrent pancreatitis (RP).

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Methods:

n = 39. Setting: Pediatric hospital. Design: Analytic cross-sectional study. Dependent variable: type of pancreatitis (AP y RP). Independent variables: DF508 mutation. Identification of the mutation DF-508 was performed with DNA extraction from blood samples and tested for DF508 amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. Statistical analysis: Chi-square and Fisher test, means, SD, Student t. p values < 0.05 were considered as significant.

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Results:

Mean age 120.8 months, 18 females. There were no differences in age, gender, ileus, jaundice, shock, severity of the pancreatitis, obesity, abdominal trauma, biliary stone disease, hepatitis, and drug ingestion among the 39 patients under study. The symptoms and signs of pancreatitis in both groups showed differences: in AP 26 (93%) had episodes of abdominal pain and in RP 11 (100%), with no significant differences. Nausea, vomiting and fever were more frequent in the AP group (p < 0.05). No DF508 mutations were detected in the 39 cases studied in the current series. Comparison of the frequencies of DF508 mutation in the current series with data from series of pediatric patients with AP, RP from other countries, suggests that it is possible the existence of demographic variability in its frequency: Oralewska identified this mutation in 16.6% of 18 Polish children (p < 0.05); and Corpino found this mutation in 8.3% of 12 cases of British children (p > 0.05).

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Conclusion:

The absence of the DF508 mutation in our patients with RP and AP compared with the findings from Poland and British series probably mean geographic and demographic differences in gene distribution.

© 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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