Skip Navigation LinksHome > August 2013 - Volume 57 - Issue 2 > Management of Cholestatic Pruritus in Paediatric Patients Wi...
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition:
doi: 10.1097/MPG.0b013e318297e384
Original Articles: Hepatology and Nutrition

Management of Cholestatic Pruritus in Paediatric Patients With Alagille Syndrome: The King's College Hospital Experience

Kronsten, Victoria; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Baker, Alastair

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Abstract

Objectives: The aims of the study were to perform a retrospective observational review of the present management and outcome of cholestatic pruritus in children with Alagille syndrome (AGS) at King's College Hospital and to use results to inform appropriate guidelines.

Methods: A retrospective review of 62 patients diagnosed as having AGS from January 1995 to November 2010 treated at King's College Hospital was performed. The departmental database of the Paediatric Liver Centre was searched to identify all patients and the clinical records were then analysed.

Results: Fifty-one (82.3%) patients experienced pruritus and 50 (80.6%) received antipruritic medication. Ursodeoxycholic acid was the most prescribed drug (n = 40). Other drugs prescribed were rifampicin (n = 39), cholestyramine (n = 18), naltrexone (n = 14), alimemazine (n = 13), nonsedating antihistamine agents (n = 7), ondansetron (n = 5), and phenobarbitone (n = 1). Albumin dialysis using the molecular adsorbent recirculation system was used in 1 patient. Sixteen patients (25.8%) were listed for liver transplantation, and 11 had undergone transplantation by November 2010. Patient survival was high at 95.2%. Pruritus resolved permanently in 39.2% (n = 20) of patients. Fifty-five percent (n = 11) of such patients had undergone liver transplantation. Pruritus was controlled by medication in 41.2% (n = 21). Itching remained a significant problem, affecting quality of life in 19.6% of patients (n = 10).

Conclusions: The management of cholestatic pruritus in AGS is difficult and often suboptimal. Pruritus may remain intractable even with combination medical treatment, and at this stage, surgery or liver transplantation is indicated. At our centre, pruritus was successfully treated in 80.4% of patients with medical and surgical management.

© 2013 by European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology,

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