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Brain-Gut Axis: From Basic Understanding to Treatment of IBS and Related Disorders

Camilleri, Michael*; Di Lorenzo, Carlo

Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition: April 2012 - Volume 54 - Issue 4 - p 446–453
doi: 10.1097/MPG.0b013e31823d34c3
Invited Reviews

ABSTRACT: The present review describes advances in understanding the mechanisms and provide an update of present and promising therapy directed at the gut or the brain in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The diagnosis of IBS typically is based on identification of symptoms, such as the Rome III criteria for IBS in adults and children. The criteria are similar in children and adults. The focus of the present review is the bowel dysfunction associated with IBS.

*Clinical Enteric Neuroscience Translational and Epidemiological Research (C.E.N.T.E.R.), College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Michael Camilleri, MD, Mayo Clinic, Charlton 8-110, 200 First St, SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (e-mail: camilleri.michael@mayo.edu).

Received 2 August, 2011

Accepted 10 October, 2011

Dr Camilleri has received research grants from Albireo (A3309), Johnson and Johnson: (prucalopride), Merck kGaA (asimadoline), Microbia (linaclotide), Takeda/Sucampo (lubiprostone), and Theravance (velusetrag), and has received honoraria below the federal threshold for significant conflict of interest from Ironwood, Movetis, Theravance, and Takeda. Dr Camilleri's research in IBS is supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01-DK079866 and 1RC1-DK086182. Dr Di Lorenzo has provided consultation and received honoraria below the federal threshold for significant conflict of interest from Ironwood, Inc.

Copyright 2012 by ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN