Parents' Willingness to Pay for Coeliac Disease Screening of Their Child

Norström, Fredrik*; Ivarsson, Anneli*; Lindholm, Lars*; Carlsson, Annelie; Danielsson, Lars; Högberg, Lotta§; Karlsson, Eva||; Löfgren, Curt*

Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition:
doi: 10.1097/MPG.0b013e3182037efd
Original Articles: Gastroenterology
Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study is to determine Swedish parents' willingness to pay (WTP) for coeliac disease (CD) screening of their child.

Subjects and Methods: CD screening was undertaken involving 10,041 12-year-old children, with 7567 (75%) agreeing to participate. Blood samples from the children were analysed for CD serological markers. Parents received a questionnaire including a scenario describing the health-related risks of having CD and screening and diagnostic procedures. Parents were also asked whether they were willing to pay for CD screening, should this not be offered free of charge, and, if so, what their maximum WTP would be. Their WTP was compared with the average cost per child for the screening and case ascertainment procedures.

Results: The questionnaire was answered by 6524 parents, and of 6057 valid responses 63% stated that they were willing to pay something. The mean WTP was 79 EUR and the median 10 EUR. The average cost per child for the screening and case ascertainment procedures was 47 EUR, which 23% of the parents stated they were willing to pay. Parents' WTP increased with higher education and income, and with child symptoms that may indicate CD.

Conclusions: Swedish parents' WTP for school-based CD screening of their child was higher than the average cost per child; however, only a minority of the parents were willing to pay that amount.

Author Information

*Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden

Department of Clinical Science, Pediatrics, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden

Pediatrics, Norrtälje Hospital, Norrtälje, Sweden

§Department of Pediatrics, Norrköping University, Norrköping, Sweden

||Pediatrics, Växjö Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.

Received 13 May, 2010

Accepted 25 October, 2010

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Fredrik Norström, PhLic, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden (e-mail: fredrik.norstrom@epiph.umu.se).

The study was performed in cooperation with the county councils of Västerbotten, Stockholm, Östergötland, Kronoberg, and Skåne and was undertaken within the Umeå Centre for Global Health Research at Umeå University. The study was funded by the Swedish Research Council; the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning; the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research; and the Vårdal Foundation. The study was part of the European Union–supported project PREVENTCD.

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

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