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AUGS Consensus Statement: Association of Anticholinergic Medication Use and Cognition in Women With Overactive Bladder

This document was developed by the American Urogynecologic Society (AUGS) Guidelines Committee with the assistance of Tonya N. Thomas, MD, and Mark D. Walters, MD. This document reflects clinical and scientific advances as of the date issued and is subject to change. The information should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of treatment or procedure to be followed. Its content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical judgment, diagnosis, or treatment. The ultimate judgment regarding any specific procedure or treatment is to be made by the physician and patient in light of all circumstances presented by the patient.

Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery: May/June 2017 - Volume 23 - Issue 3 - p 177–178
doi: 10.1097/SPV.0000000000000423
AUGS Communication

Abstract: Overactive bladder affects a significant portion of the overall population and has substantial impact on daily activities and quality-of-life. When considering treatment, behavioral therapies should be instituted first, followed by medical therapies. Anticholinergic medications and beta-3 agonists are often used as initial pharmacologic therapy, but caution should be taken in prescribing anticholinergic medications in frail or cognitively impaired patients. Recently, concerns have developed regarding anticholinergic medications and the associated risk of cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer disease in the general population. Given the available evidence, which has shown significant associations between anticholinergic medication use and increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, providers should counsel on the associated risks, prescribe the lowest effective dose, and consider alternative medications in patients at risk.

This document was developed by the American Urogynecologic Society (AUGS) Guidelines Committee with the assistance of Tonya Thomas, MD, and Mark D. Walters, MD. This document reflects clinical and scientific advances as of the date issued and is subject to change. The information should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of treatment or procedure to be followed. Its content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical judgment, diagnosis, or treatment. The ultimate judgment regarding any specific procedure or treatment is to be made by the physician and patient in light of all circumstances presented by the patient.

From the American Urogynecologic Society, Silver Spring.

Dr Walters is a consultant for Coloplast. Dr Thomas has no conflicts of interest to disclose.

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