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Prospective Cohort Study of Bowel Function After Robotic Sacrocolpopexy

Lewis, Christa DO*; Salamon, Charbel MD*; Priestley, Jennifer L. PhD; Gurshumov, Emil MD*; Culligan, Patrick MD*

Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery: March/April 2014 - Volume 20 - Issue 2 - p 87–89
doi: 10.1097/SPV.0000000000000049
Original Articles

Objective This study aimed to determine bowel function changes 12 months after robotic sacrocolpopexy.

Methods We performed a single-center prospective cohort study evaluating bowel function 12 months after robotic sacrocolpopexy between 2007 and 2011. Bowel function symptoms were measured by the Colorectal-Anal Distress Inventory, Short Form 8 (CRADI-8). Specific impacts on quality of life with regard to bowel function were evaluated using the Colorectal-Anal Impact Questionnaire, Short Form 7 (CRAIQ-7). “Splinting to defecate” was defined as any positive response to question 4 of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 which reads, “do you ever have to push on the vagina or around the rectum to have or complete a bowel movement?.” Lastly, patients were grouped according to perineorrhaphy versus no perineorrhaphy and bowel function scores were examined.

Results Of 423 consecutive patients who underwent robotic sacrocolpopexy at our institution, 393 (93%) completed a 12-month follow-up. Mean CRADI-8 scores at baseline and 12 months were 21.1 (20) and 7.3 (11), respectively (P < 0.0001). Mean CRAIQ-7 scores at baseline and 12 months were 11.1 (20) and 2.4 (9), respectively (P < 0.0001). Preoperatively, 152 patients reported a need to splint the vagina or perineum to complete a bowel movement. At 12 months, 70% reported complete resolution of “splinting.” Con comitant perineorrhaphy was performed on 87 patients and there were no differences in 12-month CRADI-8 or CRAIQ-7 scores between groups.

Conclusions Robotic sacrocolpopexy was associated with significant improvements in bowel function as measured by CRADI-8 as well as improvements in impact on quality of life as measured by CRAIQ-7.

Robotic sacrocolpopexy was associated with improvements in bowel function as measured by CRADI-8 as well as improvements in quality of life as measured by CRAIQ-7.

From the *Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ; and †College of Science and Mathematics, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA.

Reprints: Patrick Culligan, MD, Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Atlantic Health System, 435 South St, Suite 370, Morristown, NJ 07960. E-mail: Patrick.culligan@atlantichealth.org.

Dr Culligan is a paid consultant for CR Bard, Boston Scientific, and Intuitive Surgical. He receives research support from CR Bard, Boston Scientific, American Medical Systems, Coloplast, and Intuitive Surgical. Dr Salamon is a paid consultant for American Medical Systems and Intuitive Surgical. Dr Lewis, Dr Gurshumov, and Dr Priestley have declared they have no conflicts of interest.

Presented at the AAGL 41st Global Congress, November 5–9, 2012, Las Vegas, NV.

© 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins