Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Rectovaginal Fistula Repair Using a Disposable Biopsy Punch

Adelowo, Amos MD, MPH*; Ellerkmann, Richard MD; Rosenblatt, Peter MD*

Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery: January/February 2014 - Volume 20 - Issue 1 - p 52–55
doi: 10.1097/SPV.0b013e3182a33194
Case Reports

Objectives: To describe a novel surgical technique for complete excision of a rectovaginal fistula tract using a disposable biopsy punch during a transvaginal rectovaginal fistula repair and to present our initial surgical experience.

Methods: Description of 4 cases of simple rectovaginal fistulas and an innovative surgical technique for the complete excision of the fistula tract using a disposable biopsy punch.

Results: Successful 3-, 9-, and 12-month follow-up of 4 cases with simple rectovaginal fistulas after transvaginal rectovaginal fistula repair using a novel approach for complete fistula tract excision with a disposable biopsy punch and layered nonoverlapping suture closure. Demographic information reported included age, parity, medical and surgical history, as well as fistula characteristics including size, location, presenting symptoms, and duration of symptoms. We describe our operative technique with picture description.

Conclusion: This novel approach using a disposable punch biopsy device to complete excision of simple rectovaginal fistula tracts during a transvaginal rectovaginal fistula repair can help with achieving a successful surgical outcome.

Description and case discussion of a novel surgical technique for complete excision of rectovaginal fistula tract using a disposable biopsy punch during a transvaginal rectovaginal fistula repair.

From the *Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Urogynecology, Mount Auburn Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA; and †Division of Urogynecology, Weinberg Center for Women’s Health and Medicine, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, MD.

Reprints: Amos Adelowo, MD, MPH, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Urogynecology, Mount Auburn Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA; Boston Urogynecology Associates, Mount Auburn Hospital, 725 Concord Ave, Suite 1200, Cambridge, MA 02138. E-mail: aadelowo@mah.harvard.edu.

This study was conducted in Cambridge, MA.

This project was conducted with support from Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center (NIH Award #UL1 RR 025758 and financial contributions from Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers).

Video oral presentation at AUGS 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting, October 3–6, 2012, Chicago, IL.

The authors have declared they have no conflicts of interest.

Supplemental digital contents are available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.fpmrs.net).

© 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins