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Surgeon Practice Patterns for Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Gynecologic Surgery

Schimpf, Megan O. MD; Morrill, Michelle Y. MD; Margulies, Rebecca U. MD; Ward, Renée M. MD; Carberry, Cassandra L. MD, MS; Sung, Vivian W. MD, MPH

Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery: September/October 2012 - Volume 18 - Issue 5 - p 281–285
doi: 10.1097/SPV.0b013e31826446ba
Original Articles

Objective: To assess surgeon practice patterns for antibiotic prophylaxis in gynecologic surgery.

Methods: A survey was distributed at the 2011 annual scientific meeting of the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons regarding antibiotic prophylaxis practices.

Results: The response rate was 51%. Most surgeons did not use antibiotic prophylaxis for dilation and curettage without products of conception, hysteroscopy, and loop electrocautery excision procedure/cone biopsy. For laparoscopy without graft placement, 45.9% did not use prophylaxis. Prophylaxis was common for hysterectomy. For midurethral slings, 8.2% did not use prophylaxis. When graft material was used in prolapse surgery, at least 93% of surgeons administered some form of antibiotic prophylaxis. Only 70% of respondents prescribe antibiotic prophylaxis for hysterectomy consistent with recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, whereas 78% are consistent with specifications from the Joint Commission.

Conclusions: Wide variability exists in antibiotic prophylaxis in gynecologic surgery. Surgeon preference or local hospital policies affect choice of prophylaxis less than 14.9% of the time.

Wide variability exists in antibiotic prophylaxis in gynecologic surgery.

From the *Division of Urogynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; †Division of Urogynecology, Kaiser Permanente, San Francisco, CA; ‡Division of Urogynecology, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA; §Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; and ∥Division of Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery, Women and Infants Hospital, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI.

Reprints: Megan Schimpf, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, L4000 Women’s Hospital, 1500 E Medical Center Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. E-mail: mschimpf@umich.edu.

Presented as an oral poster at the 38th annual scientific meeting of the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons, Baltimore, MD, April 13–15, 2012.

The authors did not receive financial support for this work.

The authors declare that they have nothing to disclose.

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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.