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Autonomy and Self-efficacy as Influencing Factors in Nurses' Behavioral Intention to Disinfect Needleless Intravenous Systems

Smith, Judy S. MSN, RN, CRNI®; Kirksey, Kenn M. PhD, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC; Becker, Heather PhD; Brown, Adama PhD

doi: 10.1097/NAN.0b013e31821478e7
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The purpose of this study was to examine associations among nurses' behavioral intention to disinfect needleless connectors, autonomy, self-efficacy, attitudes, beliefs, perceived control, and social norms. A convenience sample (N = 171) of registered nurses participated in a cross-sectional study to examine factors related to “scrubbing the hub.” While experienced nurses reported greater autonomy and self-efficacy, recent graduates were more likely to consistently use optimal disinfection techniques. Since practice is most influenced by peers, programs should be aimed at educational pedagogy aligning preceptor practice with empirically derived guidelines. Fostering exchange of ideas in a multigenerational work force may facilitate adherence to best practices.

Senior PICC Nurse, Seton Family of Hospitals, Austin, Texas (Ms Smith); Director, The Center for Nursing Research, Seton Family of Hospitals, Austin, Texas (Dr Kirksey); and Research Scientist, School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin (Drs Becker and Brown).

Correspondence: Judy S. Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®, Seton Family of Hospitals, Austin, TX 78705 (jssmith@seton.org).

Judy S. Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®, is a Clinical Nurse Expert with the Venous Access Team at the Seton Family of Hospitals, Austin, Texas. She holds a baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN) from the University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing and an MSN degree focusing on Health Care Systems Management from Loyola University, New Orleans.

Kenn M. Kirksey, PhD, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, is the Director of Nursing Research at the Seton Family of Hospitals. He earned BSN and PhD degrees from Texas Woman's University and holds an MSN from the University of Texas at Arlington. Dr Kirksey has published extensively on lipodystrophy in persons with HIV/AIDS.

Heather Becker, PhD, is a Research Scientist at The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing. Dr Becker recently received funding from the National Cancer Institute to investigate methods for promoting wellness in cancer survivors with preexisting disabilities.

Adama Brown, PhD, is a Research Scientist and Lecturer at The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing, specializing in statistical analyses. Dr Brown has published her scientific work in numerous peer-reviewed journals.

© Copyright 2011 by the Infusion Nurses Society