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Perceptions of the Character of God as Narrated by East African Women Living With HIV

Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Kako, Peninnah M.; Kibicho, Jennifer W.

doi: 10.1097/CNJ.0b013e3182587f57
Feature: research

Abstract: Two qualitative research studies conducted with women living with HIV in Malawi (N = 72) and Kenya (N = 54) separately revealed personal faith as a primary coping mechanism that mitigates the effects of stigma and promotes spiritual, physical, and mental health. Four characteristics of God emerged that sustain the women in daily life.

Two qualitative studies with women living with HIV in Malawi (N=72) and Kenya (N=54) separately revealed faith in God as a primary coping mechanism. Be moved by the powerful words of these women.

Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu, PhD, RN, is Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing.

Peninnah M. Kako, PhD, RN, is Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing.

Jennifer W. Kibicho, PhD, is Assistant Professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Center for AIDS Intervention Research.

Sources of Funding: Funding from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Research Growth Initiative (RGI3 and RGI4) was awarded to Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu and Peninnah M. Kako; and from the University of Wisconsin Institute on Race and Ethnicity to Peninnah M. Kako, making this study and publication possible.

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The author declares no conflict of interest.

Copyright © 2012 InterVarsity Christian Fellowship