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Information for Authors

Journal of Addiction Medicine has specific instructions for submitting articles. Please read and review these carefully. Articles not submitted in accordance with instructions and guidelines are more likely to be rejected.

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JOURNAL SCOPE
ETHICAL/LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS
     
Patient anonymity and informed consent
     
Protection of Human Subjects and Animals in Research
     
Journal of Addiction Medicine consent policy for case reports
ORIGINALITY AND VALIDITY
     
Conflicts of Interest
     
Copyright
     
Authorship
PEER REVIEW
OPEN ACCESS
     
FAQ for open access
PERMISSIONS
MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION
TERMINOLOGY AND LANGUAGE
COVER LETTER
ARTICLE TYPES
     
Reporting guidelines
     
Original Research
     
Reviews
     
Clinical Case Conference
     
Clinical Practice Guidelines
     
Commentary and Debate
     
Letters to the Editor
     
Case Reports and Case Series
PREPARATION OF MANUSCRIPT
     
Title page
     
Keywords
     
Abstract
     
Text
     
Abbreviations
     
References
FIGURES AND ARTWORK
SUPPLEMENTAL DIGITAL CONTENT
TABLES
STYLE
AFTER ACCEPTANCE
     
Page proofs and corrections
     
Reprints
LANGUAGE AND TERMINOLOGY GUIDANCE FOR JOURNAL OF ADDICTION MEDICINE (JAM) MANUSCRIPTS

 

JOURNAL SCOPE

Journal of Addiction Medicine is a peer-reviewed journal designed to address the needs of the ­professional practicing in the ever-changing and challenging field of addiction medicine. Under the guidance of an esteemed Editorial Board, the Journal covers a wide range of topics relevant to clinical care and public health, including:

  • addiction and substance use in pregnancy
  • adolescent addiction and at-risk use
  • the drug-exposed neonate
  • pharmacology
  • all psychoactive substances relevant to addiction, including alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, marijuana, opioids, stimulants and other prescription and illicit substances
  • diagnosis
  • neuroimaging techniques
  • treatment of special populations
  • treatment, early intervention and prevention of alcohol and drug use disorders
  • methodological issues in addiction research
  • pain and addiction, prescription drug use disorder
  • co-occurring addiction, medical and psychiatric disorders
  • pathological gambling disorder, sexual and other behavioral addictions
  • pathophysiology of addiction
  • behavioral and pharmacological treatments
  • issues in graduate medical education
  • recovery
  • health services delivery
  • ethical, legal and liability issues in addiction medicine practice
  • drug testing
  • self- and mutual-help
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ETHICAL/LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS

Patient anonymity and informed consent

It is the author's responsibility to ensure that a patient's anonymity be carefully protected. Authors must verify that any investigation with human subjects reported in the manuscript was performed with informed consent or with a waiver approved by the appropriate ethics board, and following all the guidelines for experimental investigation with human subjects required by the institution(s) and localities with which all the authors are affiliated. If consent was not obtained, explain why. Authors must obtain written consent from people shown in figures and submit written consent with the manuscript.  To further protect anonymity, consider masking eyes.  Names should be removed from any figures or photographs.  See also policy on case report consent.

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Protection of Human Subjects and Animals in Research

For any manuscripts involving human subjects’ research, always include a statement in the methods section describing ethics (institutional review) board review and approval and consent. When reporting experiments on human subjects, author must confirm that the procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration, as revised in 2004:

http://www.wma.net/en/30publications/10policies/b3/  If doubt exists whether the research was conducted in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration, the authors must explain the rationale for their approach, and demonstrate that the institutional review body explicitly approved the doubtful aspects of the study. When reporting experiments on animals, authors must confirm that institutional and national guides for the care and use of laboratory animals were followed.

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Journal of Addiction Medicine consent policy for case reports

There is no universal consensus regarding consent for publication of case reports, except cases that are identifiable can only be published when consent has been obtained.  Note that such consent is different from research participant consent, which applies to systematic investigation of a subject or subjects with intent to generalize the findings.  Consent to publish the details of an individual’s case is obtained to respect the person’s right to privacy. 

Institutional review and ethics boards make determinations about consent for research.  However, even if consent is waived for research and even if a case report is deemed to not constitute research, consent is often required for other reasons (privacy). If a case report or case series is deemed to be research (systematic collection of data with an intent to generalize the findings) then report of approval and relevant consent should be stated as with all other research.

Consent from the subject (or parent/guardian) should be obtained for all case reports.  Consent can be on an institutional document or one similar to the examples below (modified as appropriate), and should be stored for seven years and made available to the editors and publisher on request.  State in the cover letter that written consent to publish a report of the case has been obtained by the subject and that it is available for review by the editors and publisher of the journal.

If the subject is deceased, consent should be provided by family or significant others (next-of-kin).  If consent has not been obtained, the authors must describe the circumstances of how they attempted to obtain consent or why it was not possible.

If consent is not obtained, the editors, alone or in consultation with the publisher and/or peer reviewers, will consider the extent to which the case appears to be anonymous and the exhaustive and reasonable nature of attempts to obtain consent, and whether there is any reason to suspect that a patient might have objected to publication.  The authors should carefully attempt to protect the patient’s identity.  Then the journal will attempt to balance the risk of deductive disclosure with the benefit to public health and science.  Authors should keep in mind however, that even without the inclusion of identifiers, real cases can often be identified by people in the community since cases worthy of reporting are often recognizable.

Case report manuscripts must state whether consent was obtained, along with any relevant circumstances as described above.

Sample consent forms:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/download/consent_form.pdf
http://www.bmj.com/about-bmj/resources-authors/forms-policies-and-checklists/patient-confidentiality/patient-consent-fo
http://journals.bmj.com/site/authors/editorial-policies.xhtml#patientconsent

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ORIGINALITY AND VALIDITY

A submitted manuscript must be an original contribution not previously published (except as an abstract or a preliminary report), must not be under consideration for publication elsewhere, and, if accepted, must not be published elsewhere in similar form, in any language, without the consent of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Each person listed as an author is expected to have participated in the study to a significant extent.  Although the editors and referees make every effort to ensure the validity of published manuscripts, the final responsibility rests with the authors, not with the Journal, its editors, or the publisher. Regarding attempted or actual instances of duplicate publication, plagiarism, or scientific fraud, the Journal adheres to and follows guidance from the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) http://publicationethics.org/resources/guidelines

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Conflicts of Interest

Authors must state all possible conflicts of interest in the manuscript, including financial, consultant, institutional and other relationships that might lead to bias or a conflict of interest. If there is no conflict of interest, this should also be explicitly stated as none declared.  All sources of funding should be acknowledged in the manuscript. All relevant conflicts of interest and sources of funding should be included on the title page of the manuscript with the heading “Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding:” For example: Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding: A has received honoraria from Company Z. B is currently receiving a grant (#12345) from Organization Y, and is on the speaker’s bureau for Organization X – the CME organizers for Company A. For the remaining authors none were declared.

Sources of support including those from the alcohol, tobacco, pharmaceutical or other relevant interests are to be published included in the published manuscript.

Authors of review articles and commentary/debate articles should not have any relevant financial ties to industry that produces drugs, devices, or tests or other commercial companies with an interest in the topic of the article.

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Copyright

In addition, each author must complete and submit the journal’s copyright transfer agreement, which includes a section on the disclosure of potential conflicts of interest based on the recommendations of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, “Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals” (www.icmje.org/update.html).

A copy of the form is made available to the submitting author within the Editorial Manager submission process.  Co-authors will automatically receive an Email with instructions on completing the form upon submission.Use the 'Contact Us' link above to contact the Editorial Office with any questions.

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Authorship

Consistent with International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) guidelines (http://www.icmje.org/), all listed authors must meet the following criteria:

  1. substantial contributions to conception or design of the work, or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work
  2. drafting of the work or revising it critically for important intellectual content
  3. final approval of the version to be published
  4. agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved

Anyone who meets all for criteria should be named as an author, and all authors must meet these criteria. Those who do not meet authorship criteria but who contributed to the work may be named in an acknowledgement section with their permission.

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PEER REVIEW

All papers undergo peer review, except for some commentaries and letters and editorials that may be peer reviewed or reviewed only by the Editors. Manuscripts will be sent to peer reviewers with expertise in the topics of relevance who will be asked to keep the existence of the paper and its contents confidential.  Identity of the peer reviewer is not made known to the author.  Identity of the authors is not masked.  Peer review comments are considered by the editors in the manuscript revision process.

The journal follows guidance as described by the COPE Ethical Guidelines for Peer Reviewers.

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OPEN ACCESS

LWW's hybrid open access option is offered to authors whose articles have been accepted for publication. With this choice, articles are made freely available online immediately upon publication. Authors may take advantage of the open access option at the point of acceptance to ensure that this choice has no influence on the peer review and acceptance process. These articles are subject to the Journal's standard peer-review process and will be accepted or rejected based on their own merit. Authors of accepted peer-reviewed articles have the choice to pay a fee to allow perpetual unrestricted online access to their published article to readers globally, immediately upon publication. The article processing charge for Journal of Addiction Medicine is $2,000. The article processing charge for authors funded by the Research Councils UK (RCUK) is $2,580. The publication fee is charged on acceptance of the article and should be paid within 30 days by credit card by the author, funding agency or institution. Payment must be received in full for the article to be published open access. Any additional standard publication charges, such as for color images, will also apply.

  • Authors retain copyright
    Authors retain their copyright for all articles they opt to publish open access. Authors grant LWW a license to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher.
  • Creative Commons license
    Articles opting for open access will be freely available to read, download and share from the time of publication. Articles are published under theterms of the Creative Commons License Attribution-NonCommerical No Derivative 3.0 which allows readers to disseminate and reuse the article, as well as share and reuse of the scientific material. It does not permit commercial exploitation or the creation of derivative works without specific permission. To view a copy of this license visit:  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0.
  • Compliance with NIH, RCUK, Wellcome Trust and other research funding agency accessibility requirements
    A number of research funding agencies now require or request authors to submit the post-print (the article after peer review and acceptance but not the final published article) to a repository that is accessible online by all without charge. As a service to our authors, LWW identifies to the National Library of Medicine (NLM) articles that require deposit and transmits the post-print of an article based on research funded in whole or in part by the National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, or other funding agencies to PubMed Central. The revised Copyright Transfer Agreement provides the mechanism. LWW ensures that authors can fully comply with the public access requirements of major funding bodies worldwide. Additionally, all authors who choose the open access option will have their final published article deposited into PubMed Central.
    RCUK and Wellcome funded authors can choose to publish their paper as open access with the payment of an article process charge (gold route), or opt for their accepted manuscript to be deposited (green route) into PMC with an embargo.
    With both the gold and green open access options, the author will continue to sign the Copyright Transfer Agreement (CTA) as it provides the mechanism for LWW to ensure that the author is fully compliant with the requirements. After signature of the CTA, the author will then sign a License to Publish where they will then own the copyright. Those authors who wish to publish their article via the gold route will be able to publish under the terms of the Attribution 3.0 (CCBY) License. To view of a copy of this license visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/. Those authors who wish to publish their article via the green route will be able to publish under the rights of the Attribution Non-commercial 3.0 (CCBY NC) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/).
    It is the responsibility of the author to inform the Editorial Office and/or LWW that they have RCUK funding. LWW will not be held responsible for retroactive deposits to PMC if the author has not completed the proper forms.

FAQ for open access

http://links.lww.com/LWW-ES/A48

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PERMISSIONS

Authors must submit written permission from the copyright owner (usually the publisher) to use direct quotations, tables, or illustrations that have appeared in copyrighted form elsewhere, along with complete details about the source. Any permissions fees that might be required by the copyright owner are the responsibility of the authors requesting use of the borrowed material, not the responsibility of Wolters Kluwer, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION

All manuscripts must be submitted online through the new Web site at http://jam.edmgr.com. First-time users: Please click the Register button from the menu above and enter the requested information. On successful registration, you will be sent an e-mail indicating your user name and password. Print a copy of this information for future reference. Note: If you have received an e-mail from us with an assigned user ID and password, or if you are a repeat user, do not register again. Just log in. Once you have an assigned ID and password, you do not have to re-register, even if your status changes (that is, author, reviewer, or editor). Authors: Please click the log-in button from the menu at the top of the page and log in to the system as an Author. Submit your manuscript according to the author instructions. You will be able to track the progress of your manuscript through the system. If you experience any problems, please contact Michael A. Arends, Managing Editor, marends@scripps.edu; fax: 858-784-7405.

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TERMINOLOGY AND LANGUAGE

The Editors strongly encourage use of precise terminology by authors when submitting manuscripts to Journal of Addiction Medicine.  The guidance reflects current diagnostic trends, and recommends precise terms that are respectful of persons with the spectrum of substance use and related disorders. See guidelines on language.

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COVER LETTER

A cover letter should accompany the submitted manuscript and should attest to the originality of the submission, note any relevant conflicts of interest, and should attest to the authorship criteria above.

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ARTICLE TYPES

Reporting guidelines

All articles submitted, including but not limited to original research, clinical trials, observational studies, and systematic reviews, should follow internationally recognized reporting standards.  Such standards can be found here http://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/ and here http://www.consort-statement.org/ and here http://www.prisma-statement.org/

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Original Research

Scientifically rigorous reports of original work that advance the field of Addiction Medicine. Typically, articles will contain new data derived from a sizable series of patients or subjects. The text cannot exceed 3,500 words (which does not include an abstract of no more than 250 words), a maximum of 5 tables and figures (total), and up to 40 references.Word count includes only the main body of text (i.e., not tables, figures, abstracts or references). Additional tables can be submitted in a separate file as supplemental data for posting online. As part of the discussion or concluding remarks sections, the editors strongly encourage authors to provide a bench to bedside correlation, a statement of potential or actual clinical relevance of the findings, to assist the clinician in applying new findings to the practice setting. If the original research is a controlled study of a health care intervention, list the name of the trial registry and the unique identification number.

Systematic reviews are also considered original research papers. Such reviews should address a clear and specific clinical question and should carefully describe article selection, summarize and synthesize study quality and results, and present conclusions about the answer to the question.  Systematic reviews often have the need to include long reference lists and many tables.  While these may not exceed the above limits, supplemental content can be provided as above to address these needs.

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Reviews

JAM welcomes both unsolicited and commissioned reviews.  Consensus statements will be considered as review articles.

For narrative (expert, non-systematic) reviews, please submit only an outline directly to the editorial office for approval before writing the review. Send the outline to: JAMReviewOutline@gmail.com. If your outline is accepted, then you will be invited to write the review.

In general, we encourage such reviews  to be accompanied by a Clinical Case Conference (see below). This type of review is not intended to be a forum for the presentation of new data or meta-analyses. Authors of reviews will be asked to concurrently provide a Clinical Case Conference, with discussion of the case by leading clinicians in Addiction Medicine. The Clinical Case Conference shall serve to reinforce information presented in the review and translate research and evidence-based medicine into actual clinical practice. The review text cannot exceed 5,000 words with an abstract of no more than 250 words, a maximum of 5 tables and figures (total), and up to 50 references. The word count includes only the main body of the text (i.e., not including tables, figures, the abstract, or references). Additional tables or figures can be submitted in a separate file as supplemental data for posting online.

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Clinical Case Conference

Clinical Case Conferences consist of the presentation of an anonymous patient case, followed by discussion from 2-3 different clinician viewpoints on how best to assess, diagnose, and treat the patient. The case and following discussion shall serve to translate research findings (as introduced in the Scholarly Review) into clinical practice by demonstrating how information conveyed in the Scholarly Review can best be applied towards optimal patient care. Only one patient case will be discussed; however, it may either represent a real patient or an amalgamation of real patients synthesized into a single case to enhance teaching. Either approach should be clearly stated in the manuscript. The Clinical Case Conference must always be submitted with a scholarly Review. The editors will solicit scholarly Reviews and Clinical Case Conferences of timely topic areas relevant to the practicing addiction medicine clinician. The lead author of the Clinical Case Conference should ideally also be the lead author of the scholarly Review to maximize continuity between the manuscripts; however, exceptions can be made. The word count for a Clinical Case Conference cannot exceed 4,500 words, and the references should not exceed 20. Samples of published Clinical Case Conferences are available from the editor upon request.

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Clinical Practice Guidelines

Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) are acceptable for review and publication, in summary/abbreviated form if space does not allow full publication, using the same word/table/figure limit guidance as for reviews.  CPGs will be peer-reviewed as with any other manuscripts published in JAM. In accordance with National Academy of Medicine guidance https://www.iom.edu/Reports/2011/Clinical-Practice-Guidelines-We-Can-Trust.aspx, guidelines should be based on systematic review, be developed by a knowledgeable multidisciplinary panel of experts and representatives from key affected groups (all of whom should be listed in the document), should minimize conflicts of interest, should provide a clear transparent account of the process, should explicitly address the strength of the evidence and recommendations, be revised as appropriate.  The abstract should include a description of the guideline, the methods and the main recommendations. Headings should include the rationale for the guideline, the focus of the guideline, the target population, the methods/process, solicited comments and changes, recommendations, implications for care, research and implementation, and a summary.

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Commentary and Debate

Topics addressed may include articles included in the current or recent issue (these are generally invited papers), issues currently before the addiction medicine community, or other topics at the discretion of the Editor. The text cannot exceed 1500 words, with up to 15 references.  A debate format is encouraged in the form of two commentaries submitted in a coordinated fashion espousing opposing views on a topic.  Please submit a proposal/brief outline of the topic and proposed debate and authors to the editorial office for approval prior to writing and submitting the paper.

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Letters to the Editor

Brief pieces, ideally in reference to an article previously published in JAM. The text cannot exceed 500 words, no more than one table or figure, and up to 10 references. Word count includes only the main body of text (i.e., not tables, figures or references).  Brief research letters are also considered for publication.

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Case Reports and Case Series

Brief reports of relevance to the field with potential for impact will be considered. In general case reports and series should address unexpected or new findings, such as side effects, medication interactions, disease presentations, and courses, and/or manifestations of illness that suggest a new scientific understanding. They should have value for medical knowledge and raise questions about current diagnosis and treatment, sometimes suggesting change in practice may be necessary. The case(s) should include relevant history, physical and laboratory findings. The report should include a review of prior cases and case series. The manuscript should include a brief background and context, the case(s) (including a statement about consent), and a discussion, that in addition to reviewing prior cases, should make clear what the new knowledge is and its implications. The text cannot exceed 1500 words, no more than one table, no more than one figure or image, and up to 20 references. Word count includes only the main body of text (i.e., not tables, figures or references).  Case reports must address the issue of consent in accordance with the Journal policy.

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PREPARATION OF MANUSCRIPT

Manuscripts that do not adhere to the following instructions will be returned to the corresponding author for technical revision before undergoing peer review. The file format for the Abstract and Manuscript and any other textual material should be in Microsoft Word only; Adobe PDF and other file formats cannot be processed by the editorial office.

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Title page

Include on the title page: (a) complete manuscript title; (b) authors’ full names, highest academic degrees, and affiliations; (c) name and address for correspondence, including fax number, telephone number, and e-mail address; and (d) sources of support that require acknowledgment.
The title page must also include disclosure of funding received for this work from any of the following organizations: National Institutes of Health (NIH); Wellcome Trust; Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI); and other(s).

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Keywords

Authors should provide 3–5 keywords for each article.

Abstract

Limit the abstract to 250 words. Do not cite references in the abstract. Limit the use of abbreviations and acronyms. Original articles should have a structured abstract organized under the following subheads: Objectives, Methods, Results, and Conclusions.

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Text

Organize the manuscript into six main headings: Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, and Acknowledgments. Define abbreviations at first mention in text and in each table and figure. If a brand name is cited, supply the manufacturer’s name and address (city and state/country). Acknowledge all forms of support, including pharmaceutical and industry support, in an Acknowledgment paragraph.

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Abbreviations

For a list of standard abbreviations, consult the Council of Biology Editors Style Guide (available from the Council of Science Editors, Drohan Management Group, 12100 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 130, Reston, VA 20190) or other standard sources. Write out the full term for each abbreviation at its first use unless it is a standard unit of measure.

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References

References should be cited in the text by name of author(s) and year of publication; for papers written by three or more authors, use "et al." If several references are cited at the same place in the text, they must be in chronological order; within the same year, they should be in alphabetical order by the first author's name. Text citations should correspond exactly in spelling and year of publication with information in the List of References. Be sure that every reference in the List of References is cited in the text, and vice versa.

The List of References should be typed double-spaced at the end of the text, following the sample formats given below. The list should include only published papers or papers that have been formally accepted for publication (list these as "in press" and give the name of the journal). Those which are in preparation or have been submitted for publication as well as personal communications or theses should not be included in the List of References; rather they should be identified in the text.

Arrange references in strict alphabetical order by author(s). Chronological order should be used only in the case of multiple papers with the exact same authorship. If published in the same year, distinguish by a, b, etc., after the year. For abbreviations of journal names, refer to List of Journals Indexed in Index Medicus [available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, U.S.A. DHEW Publication No. (NIH) 82-267; ISSN 0093-3821]. Provide all authors' names when fewer than seven; when seven or more, list the first three and add "et al." Provide article titles and inclusive pages. Accuracy of reference data is the responsibility of the author. Sample references are given below:

Journal article
1. Sakai K, Akima M, Saito K, et al. Nicorandil metabolism in rat myocardial mitochondria. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2000;35:723–728.

Book chapter
2. Todd VR. Visual information analysis: frame of reference for visual perception. In: Kramer P, Hinojosa J, eds. Frames of Reference for Pediatric occupational therapy. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1999:205–256.

Entire book
3. Kellman RM, Marentette LJ. Atlas of Craniomaxillofacial Fixation. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1999.

Software
4. Epi Info [computer program]. Version 6. Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 1994.

Online journals
5. Friedman SA. Preeclampsia: a review of the role of prostaglandins. Obstet Gynecol [serial online]. January 1988;71:22–37. Available from: BRS Information Technologies, McLean, VA. Accessed December 15, 1990.

Database
6. CANCERNET-PDQ [database online]. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute; 1996. Updated March 29, 1996.

World Wide Web
7. Gostin LO. Drug use and HIV/AIDS [JAMA HIV/AIDS web site]. June 1, 1996. Available at: http://www.amaassn.org/special/hiv/ethics. Accessed June 26, 1997.

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FIGURES AND ARTWORK

A) Creating Digital Artwork

  1. Learn about the publication requirements for Digital Artwork: http://links.lww.com/ES/A42
  2. Create, Scan and Save your artwork and compare your final figure to the Digital Artwork Guideline Checklist (below).
  3. Upload each figure to Editorial Manager in conjunction with your manuscript text and tables.

B) Digital Artwork Guideline Checklist
Here are the basics to have in place before submitting your digital artwork:

  • Artwork should be saved as TIFF, EPS, or MS Office (DOC, PPT, XLS) files. High resolution PDF files are also acceptable.
  • Crop out any white or black space surrounding the image.
  • Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and other line art must be vector or saved at a resolution of at least 1200 dpi. If created in an MS Office program, send the native (DOC, PPT, XLS) file.
  • Photographs, radiographs and other halftone images must be saved at a resolution of at least 300 dpi.
  • Photographs and radiographs with text must be saved as postscript or at a resolution of at least 600 dpi.
  • Each figure must be saved and submitted as a separate file. Figures should not be embedded in the manuscript text file.

Remember:

  • Cite figures consecutively in your manuscript.
  • Number figures in the figure legend in the order in which they are discussed.
  • Upload figures consecutively to the Editorial Manager web site and enter figure numbers consecutively in the Description field when uploading the files.

Figure legends

Include legends for all figures. They should be brief and specific, and they should appear on a separate manuscript page after the references. Use scale markers in the image for electron micrographs, and indicate the type of stain used.

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SUPPLEMENTAL DIGITAL CONTENT

Supplemental Digital Content (SDC): Authors may submit SDC via Editorial Manager to LWW journals that enhance their article's text to be considered for online posting. SDC may include standard media such as text documents, graphs, audio, video, etc. On the Attach Files page of the submission process, please select Supplemental Audio, Video, or Data for your uploaded file as the Submission Item. If an article with SDC is accepted, our production staff will create a URL with the SDC file. The URL will be placed in the call-out within the article. SDC files are not copy-edited by LWW staff, they will be presented digitally as submitted. For a list of all available file types and detailed instructions, please visit http://links.lww.com/A142.

SDC Call-outs
Supplemental Digital Content must be cited consecutively in the text of the submitted manuscript. Citations should include the type of material submitted (Audio, Figure, Table, etc.), be clearly labeled as "Supplemental Digital Content," include the sequential list number, and provide a description of the supplemental content. All descriptive text should be included in the call-out as it will not appear elsewhere in the article.
Example:
We performed many tests on the degrees of flexibility in the elbow (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, which demonstrates elbow flexibility) and found our results inconclusive.

List of Supplemental Digital Content
A listing of Supplemental Digital Content must be submitted at the end of the manuscript file. Include the SDC number and file type of the Supplemental Digital Content. This text will be removed by our production staff and not be published.
Example:
Supplemental Digital Content 1.wmv

SDC File Requirements
All acceptable file types are permissible up to 10 MBs. For audio or video files greater than 10 MBs, authors should first query theJjournal office for approval. For a list of all available file types and detailed instructions, please visit
http://links.lww.com/A142.

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TABLES

Create tables using the table creating and editing feature of your word processing software (e.g., Word, WordPerfect). Do not use Excel or comparable spreadsheet programs. Group all tables in a separate file. Cite tables consecutively in the text, and number them in that order. Each table should appear on a separate page and should include the table title, appropriate column heads, and explanatory legends (including definitions of any abbreviations used). Do not embed tables within the body of the manuscript. They should be self-explanatory and should supplement, rather than duplicate, the material in the text.

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STYLE

Pattern manuscript style after the American Medical Association Manual of Style (9th edition). Stedman’s Medical Dictionary (27th edition) and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (10th edition) should be used as standard references. Refer to drugs and therapeutic agents by their accepted generic or chemical names, and do not abbreviate them. Use code numbers only when a generic name is not yet available. In that case, supply the chemical name and a figure giving the chemical structure of the drug. Capitalize the trade names of drugs and place them in parentheses after the generic names. To comply with trademark law, include the name and (city and state/country) of the manufacturer of any drug, supply, or equipment mentioned in the manuscript. Use the metric system to express units of measure and degrees Celsius to express temperatures, and use SI units rather than conventional units.

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AFTER ACCEPTANCE

Page proofs and corrections

Corresponding authors will receive electronic page proofs to check the copyedited and typeset article before publication. Portable document format (PDF) files of the typeset pages and support documents (e.g., reprint order form) will be sent to the corresponding author by e-mail. Complete instructions will be provided with the e-mail for downloading and printing the files and for faxing the corrected page proofs to the publisher. Those authors without an e-mail address will receive traditional page proofs. It is the author’s responsibility to ensure that there are no errors in the proofs. Changes that have been made to conform to journal style will stand if they do not alter the authors’ meaning. Only the most critical changes to the accuracy of the content will be made. Changes that are stylistic or are a reworking of previously accepted material will be disallowed. The publisher reserves the right to deny any changes that do not affect the accuracy of the content. Authors may be charged for alterations to the proofs beyond those required to correct errors or to answer queries. Proofs must be checked carefully and corrections faxed within 24 to 48 hours of receipt, as requested in the cover letter accompanying the page proofs.

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Reprints

Authors will receive a reprint order form and a price list with the page proofs. Reprint requests should be returned with the corrected proofs, if possible. Reprints are normally shipped 6 to 8 weeks after publication of the issue in which the article appears. For any questions regarding reprints or publication fees, contact the Reprint Department by mail at Wolters Kluwer, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 351 West Camden Street, Baltimore, MD 21201; by phone at 1–800-341–2258 FREE; by fax at 410-528-4434; or by e-mail at: reprints@lww.com.

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LANGUAGE AND TERMINOLOGY GUIDANCE FOR JOURNAL OF ADDICTION MEDICINE (JAM) MANUSCRIPTS

The Editors strongly encourage use of precise terminology by authors when submitting manuscripts to Journal of Addiction Medicine.  The following guidelines reflect current diagnostic trends, are precise, and are respectful of persons with the spectrum of substance use disorders.

  1. Please use “person first” language (e.g. “person/patient/participant with alcohol use disorder”, rather than “alcoholic”).  “Addict” and “alcoholic,” while popular among some patients and the lay public, can be stigmatizing, dehumanizing, and they do not reflect the very human condition of addiction.  Patients are not “addicts” or “alcoholics” but instead are people or persons with medical illnesses defined by consensus-driven medical terms such as “alcohol use disorder,” “opioid use disorder,” “gambling disorder.” 
  2. Do not use the word “abuse” in reference to substance use unless referring to a diagnosis in pre-DSM 5 versions of the American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).  Similarly do not use the word “abuser.”  “Use” is often the appropriate replacement for “abuse.”
  3. Preferred terms for the disease include substance use disorder, alcohol use disorder, drug use disorder, gambling disorder (DSM-defined terms), and addiction (when used as defined by American Society of Addiction Medicine).  Use of terms in other diagnostic systems is acceptable provided the terms are used as defined. Examples might include “dependence” when referring to pre-DSM 5 or International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnoses, or the ICD diagnosis harmful use.  Note that drug should generally not be used when the more appropriate term is medication.
  4. Terminology that attempts to quantify or risk stratify substance use or gambling should be defined within the manuscript.  However, we recommend to the author to:
    • Avoid using the imprecise terms “misuse,” “problem use,” “inappropriate use,” or “binge or binge drinking.”  For example “binge” has been used to a mean heavy drinking episode as defined by number of drinks per unit time, but also as several days of continuous heavy use.
    • “Moderate” drinking is non-specific and implies associations with values or outcomes.  “Low” risk or “lower” risk is preferred, or simply specify the amount (e.g. fewer than 2 drinks per day).
    • Preferred terms for use that risks health consequences include “at-risk” or “risky” or “hazardous use.”  “Harmful use” is an ICD diagnosis and its use should be restricted to that diagnosis.  “Problem use” can refer to use associated with consequences that do not meet criteria for a substance use disorder/addiction.  “Unhealthy use” refers to the full spectrum from risky use to a disorder.  http://www.asam.org/advocacy/find-a-policy-statement/view-policy-statement/public-policy-statements/2014/08/01/terminology-related-to-the-spectrum-of-unhealthy-substance-use
  5. Use medical, not non-medical language:
    • Avoid “medication-assisted” unless referring to specific programs with those names.  Medication is a treatment, so it might be called “treatment” or “opioid agonist treatment,” for example.
    • “Medical record” is preferred over “chart.”
    • Avoid “drunk,” “smashed,” “bombed.”  Instead use “intoxicated” consistent with the DSM.
  6. Avoid inaccurate or imprecise terms:
    • “Opiates” refer to naturally occurring or derived substances (e.g. morphine, heroin).  “Opioids” is a broader term that includes synthetics and semi-synthetics.
    • “Adherence” is preferred over “compliance” when referring to use of health services or medications. 
    • For specificity, “history of” and “active” should be avoided in favor of more specific descriptions (e.g. “past 30-day use,” “current [past year] diagnosis”).
    • Avoid “substitution” therapy”.  “Substitution” is not a correct characterization of medication treatment (for example, opioid agonist treatment does not generally produce euphoria or short-lived increases in blood opioid levels).  Thus, for opioids, “agonist treatment” or “opioid agonist treatment” are preferred.
  7. Avoid stigmatizing language:
    • Do not use “dirty” or “clean” urine or test results, use instead “positive” or “negative” urine or “urine positive for cocaine”, or “cocaine detected,” etc.
    • Do not use “drunk, pothead, crackhead, meth addict, etc.”  Instead use “patient with [insert substance] use disorder.”
    • Do not use “frequent flyer” or “recidivist”.  Instead use “patient with multiple relapses.”
    • Avoid stating that the patient failed treatment.  Instead note that the treatment failed or was not efficacious or effective.

Physicians generally encourage patients and research participants to use commonly accepted medical terminology. For example, patients are taught about “diabetes” instead of “sugar” by health care workers. It has been acceptable for patients or research participants to use “vernacular/slang” language when discussing substance use with clinicians.  This may result in confusion or even suboptimal care since healthcare workers may be unfamiliar with common use of lay terms.  In the practice of Addiction Medicine, or in the reporting of peer-reviewed papers in JAM, the use of humanizing, non-stigmatizing, medically-defined, precise, and professional consensus-driven terminology is important. This will help assure that patients receive respectful high quality treatment and that communication is as clear as possible.

References:

American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Arlington, VA, American Psychiatric Association, 2013

Broyles LM, Binswanger IA, Jenkins JA, Finnell DS, Faseru B, Cavaiola A, Pugatch M, Gordon AJ.  Confronting inadvertent stigma and pejorative language in addiction scholarship: a recognition and response.  Subst Abus. 2014;35(3):217-21. doi: 10.1080/08897077.2014.930372.

Friedmann PD, Schwartz RP. Just call it “treatment.” Addiction Science & Clinical Practice 2012, 7:10

Samet JH, Fiellin DA.  Opioid substitution therapy—time to replace the term

The Lancet , Volume 385 , Issue 9977 , 1508 - 1509

Kelly JF, Wakeman SE, Saitz R.  Stop talking 'dirty': clinicians, language, and quality of care for the leading cause of preventable death in the United States.  Am J Med. 2015 Jan;128(1):8-9. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2014.07.043. Epub 2014 Sep 3.

Kelly JF, Westerhoff C. Does it matter how we refer to individuals with substance-related problems? A randomized study with two commonly used terms

Int J Drug Policy, 21 (2010), pp. 202–207

Kelly JF, Dow SJ, Westerhoff C. Does our choice of substance-related terms influence perceptions of treatment need? An empirical investigation with two commonly used terms J Drug Issues, 40 (2010), pp. 805–818

Salsitz EA, Miller SC. Perspectives: the language of addiction. American Society of Addiction Medicine News 2002 November/December;17(6):13.

Terminology Related to Addiction, Treatment and Recovery.  http://www.asam.org/advocacy/find-a-policy-statement/view-policy-statement/public-policy-statements/2014/08/01/terminology-related-to-addiction-treatment-and-recovery

Terminology Related to the Spectrum of Unhealthy Substance Use.  http://www.asam.org/advocacy/find-a-policy-statement/view-policy-statement/public-policy-statements/2014/08/01/terminology-related-to-the-spectrum-of-unhealthy-substance-use

The Definition of Addiction. http://www.asam.org/advocacy/find-a-policy-statement/view-policy-statement/public-policy-statements/2011/12/15/the-definition-of-addiction

Van Boekel LC, Brouwers EP, van Weeghal J, Garretsen HF. Stigma among health professionals towards patients with substance use disorders and its consequences for healthcare delivery: a systematic review Drug Alcohol Depend, 131 (2013), pp. 23–35

Wakeman SE.  Language and Addiction: Choosing Words Wisely. American Journal of Public Health: April 2013, Vol. 103, No. 4, pp. e1-e2.

doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.301191

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