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Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease:
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Prognostic Significance of Antisocial Personality Disorder in Cocaine-Dependent Patients Entering Continuing Care

McKAY, JAMES R. Ph.D.1; ALTERMAN, ARTHUR I. Ph.D.1; CACCIOLA, JOHN S. Ph.D.2; MULVANEY, FRANK D. PSY.D.1; O'BRIEN, CHARLES P. M.D., Ph.D.1,2

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Abstract

This study examined the relationship of antisocial personality disorder (APD) to response to continuing care treatments in a sample of cocaine-dependent patients. Patients (N = 127) were randomly assigned to 20-week standard group or individualized relapse prevention continuing care interventions after the completion of an initial treatment episode and followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months. APD and non-APD patients did not differ on retention in continuing care, substance use outcomes, social function outcomes, or experiences before or during cocaine relapse episodes. A diagnosis of APD was also not a predictor of differential response to the two continuing care interventions in the study. However, APD patients had worse medical and psychiatric problem severity than non-APD patients at entrance to continuing care and during follow-up. These results suggest that cocaine patients with APD who are in the continuing care phase of outpatient rehabilitation might benefit from additional medical and psychiatric treatment services.

© 2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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